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What is interior protection?

A temporary interior protection system (TIPS) can be installed in manufacturing plants, hospitals, schools, warehouses and production facilities. Different TIPS services include Construction Wall Barriers, Suspended Ceilings, and High Structure Cleaning. Temporary interior protection systems employ reinforced engineered poly film and other installation methods. They help prevent re-roofing and re-modeling debris from contaminating clean-room environments. They are useful in retail stores, office spaces, and commercial establishments.

Interior protection is part of the construction of the space. It involves the application of systems that will keep the environment clean and free from contamination against dust and debris during re-roofing and remodeling projects. This then gives a higher level of peace of mind.  Another application of interior protection is construction wall barriers, used to separate a construction project that produces dust, debris, and/or odor from the rest of business operations.
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The following is an excerpt from my blog at deathofdrawing.com related to my new book The Death of Drawing: Architecture in the Age of Simulation published by Routledge.

Among the professionals involved in the building industry, architects have a unique ability- even a duty- to apply a broad range of criteria in making design decisions. This is the essence of the traditional role of architects in building- not only to know about how things are built, but also to question assumptions and conventions of building in light of their larger effects on human life. The philosopher Karsten Harries has called this broad questioning of goals and means of building the ethical function of architecture, and it is precisely what distinguishes architecture from other building design disciplines.

The proliferation of building and design technologies has made technology an area of particular importance for this aspect of architecture. Technology is vital to our society, culture and economy. Unfortunately, it has no built-in guide as to what problems to take on or what criteria to apply in finding solutions. It’s like a precocious child- capable of amazing things but lacking the basic sense not to play in traffic. Like a child, it needs to be allowed to explore while being guided by wisdom and experience. The problems we ask technology to solve, both the goals and the means used to achieve them, need to be chosen according to a broad range of criteria. Architects are uniquely prepared to do this in the domain of building and design technology.

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The Small Firm Round Table is developing an application for emerging professionals in architecture and hoping to include potential users in the development. Please participate in this short 5 question survey and contact Christian Taylor at christiantaylor@aia.org if you are interested in learning more about the app or getting involved.

Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/5BP68ZK
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We are not the first or last generations of architects to deal with the high performance requirements of our day.  Consider the castles that resisted mass assault and cannon fire, the palaces and cathedrals that harvested daylight with such craft, the great opera houses that resonated like fine instruments, the great step wells that stored so much accessible water, or the great aqueducts and conduits that functioned for centuries.  These were all designed and built to last forever, so to speak.  The great investments often paid dividends to societies for centuries.  In high contrast, most of what architects have been asked to design the last few hundred years was not expected to last more than a generation or so.  In sync with this outlook futurists often created visions of what was to come as completely new with no evidence of older construction or development patterns.  Though this vision of the future has occasionally been replaced the last few decades with either future life among the ruins of what our cities look like today or shown as a more probable future that embraces both old and new (much the way we live today) such as was illustrated in the film “Minority Report”.

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Best in American Living Awards: Home Design’s Top Honor

There's only a few weeks left until the Best in American Living Awards' entry deadline!

 

A lot has changed over the 30 years since the Best in American Living Awards began redefining design excellence for the entire residential building industry. But one thing has remained the same—the program is the nation's most prestigious housing honor, celebrating innovative, creative and cutting-edge design in building, remodeling, single—and multifamily and even specialty projects.

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Writing in from the International Union of Architects Congress in Durban, South Africa:   The first part of this week’s events is educational with keynotes, academic sessions, workshops, and lots of meet and greet with architects from around the world. It’s been a tremendous opportunity to gain a new perspective on the world and the role of the architect from the southern hemisphere – maybe it’s something about the sun rising in the east and then heading north? Very bizarre.  Anyway, we’ve been hearing a lot of numbers over the past few days, like: 

5% of buildings in the world are designed by architects, 95% are not
1.6 billion people live in slums, or “informal settlements”,  with a predicted 3 billion people in slums by 2030
80 billion square meters of new/renovated buildings by 2050  
1 toilet for every 440 people living in informal settlements in Mumbai 

I’ve

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I did not expect to be able to see the sun rise over the ocean this summer, especially the Indian Ocean.  As newly elected AIA President-elect-elect, I am attending the International Union of Architects (UIA) Congress and Assembly in Durban, South Africa.  In the short five weeks since the Chicago convention and election a number of new calendar entries have popped up for me, but this is a big one that quickly replaced my summer vacation.


Similar to our own convention, but in reverse, there is a three day conference followed by a business meeting.  The range and volume of programs is staggering like our own convention but the diversity of the attendees is a true eye-opener.  The variety of dress and the range of languages remind you each moment that this is a truly international gathering of Architects.

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It is quite astonishing to be here at the UIA 2014 world Conference in
Durban, South Africa.

What a privilege to be in the midst of a 4,222 architects from all 
over the world! Coming from the somewhat monochromatic community of Western Massachusetts, it is
truly a delight to see/hear/chat with colleagues from everywhere.

The theme of the conference is “Otherwhere”—where we haven't been, where we want to go. For Durban & South Africa, it has to do with celebrating 20 years since apartheid was overturned. It is important to Africans to talk about how far they have come, and how far they still need to go. To heal the social wounds and build an environment that is just, economically viable, and culturally lively.

And it is such a valid topic for the rest of world as well. After all, there is growing disparity between the rich and poor, diminishing resources and growing climate unrest. Democracies are not flourishing, and architects find the profession ever more complex and difficult.
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Styles and building materials -- whether brownstone from Portland or brick from Windsor -- tell only part of the story of Connecticut's architectural heritage, which stretches back even before the country was born. The structures erected, those torn down and replaced and those still standing reflect the evolving social and economic fabric of the state, from buildings clustered around a town green in Colonial times to bringing back pedestrian-friendly downtowns in the 21st century.

http://www.historicphoenix.com/architectural-styles/images/architecture.jpg

From dozens of the suggestions, structures in this gallery were selected, with the help of an architect Michael J. Crosbie, a professor of architecture at the University of Hartford who occasionally writes about architecture and design
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“Conservation” is a term most often associated with saving species, forests, reefs, old media and art, and old buildings. However this amazing term applies to economics, fuel sourced energy, and many other resources. As we discuss “high performance” as a response to sustainability and resilience we need to rediscover the essential role conservation plays in our future. Currently many publicized “sustainable” projects tend to cost a great deal more to design, to build, and to operate than baseline buildings of our day. This is unfortunate for everyone because sustainability is founded on conservation of our resources meaning fuel based energy, materials, and capital. The Brundtland Commission definition of sustainability, “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”, describes conservation in all but name. Our work as architects should be founded on the ideals of conservation to meet any reasonable measure of sustainability. If our designs do not save land, fuel based energy, embodied energy, and embodied capital we are not preparing for the future. Architects are by our very nature futurists, everything we do is about the future and most of our decisions will outlive us all. As a class, we owe it to those we serve and care for to take our role seriously as the ability to overcome what faces our civilization will be directly proportional to the seeds we sow today. Happily conservation as a concept is embraced by people of most political persuasions so the wind is in our sails whether we know it or not.
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