2013 Recipients

The AIA Small Project Practitioners (SPP) Knowledge Community presents the ninth annual Small Project Award Program to recognize the work of small project practitioners and to promote excellence in small project design. This Award Program strives to raise public awareness of the value and design excellence that architects bring to all project types, including renovations and additions, no matter the limits of size and budget. Read the letter from the Chair.





                                                                                                                                         

Bemis Infoshop

Category 1 Recipient
Architect: Jeffrey L. Day; Min | Day
Location: Omaha, Nebraska

More than a new entry and reception area for a contemporary art center, the InfoShop is a social condenser and transition space between the city and the galleries. With increasing emphasis on social and environmental issues, the art center is becoming a laboratory for ideas rather than a repository for artifacts.

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Studio for a Composer

Category 1 Recipient
Architect: Sebastian Schmaling, AIA; Johnsen Schmaling Architects
Location: Spring Prairie, Wisconsin

An unassuming structure nestled into a rural Wisconsin hillside, this intimate retreat serves as a studio for a Country Western musician to write his work and reconnect with nature. With its exacting construction details and a carefully restrained material palette, the building continues the tradition of Midwestern pastoral architecture and its proud legacy of aesthetic sobriety, functional lucidity and robust craftsmanship.

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Cemetery Marker

Category 1 Recipient
Architect: Paul Kariouk; Kariouk Associates
Location: South Canaan, Pennsylvania

Before dying, a woman left a note for her children to be read after her death. This note was less a will (she had nothing material to leave her children) than several abstract wishes for them. The sole request on her own behalf was that her gravesite becomes a garden.

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Pavilion at Cotillion Park

Category 2 Recipient
Architect: Mell Lawrence, FAIA; Mell Lawrence Architects
Location: Dallas, Texas

Commissioned by the Dallas Parks Department, this new shade structure bridges the gap between two groups of trees at a natural gathering place in the park. The composition of steel components abstracts and mimics the surrounding trees to produce similar dappled shade. The sun’s movement animates the structure, catching direct light, casting shadows and patterns, and creating dynamic figure-ground shapes against the sky.

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Webb Chapel Park Pavilion

Category 2 Recipient
Architect: Wendy Evans Joseph & Chris Cooper; Cooper Joseph Studio
Location: Misson, Texas

We were asked by the Department of Parks and Recreation to create a picnic pavilion to replace a decaying 1960s shelter. Given Texan heat and humidity, climate control was a priority. The site plan creates a shaded area for both a playground, and a soccer field. From a cultural point of view, a highly challenging community meant eliminating hidden areas. All surfaces are highly durable, fireproof and maintenance free. It is a bold design with a playful demeanor.

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Nexus House

Category 2 Recipient
Architect: Sebastian Schmaling, AIA; Johnsen Schmaling Architects
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

This compact home for a young family occupies a small site in a historic residential district in downtown Madison, Wisconsin. Successfully contesting the local preservation ordinance and its narrow interpretation of stylistic compatibility, the house is an unapologetically contemporary building, its formally restrained volume discreetly placed in the back of the trapezoidal site to minimize direct visual competition with its historic neighbors.

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308 Mulberry

Category 3 Recipient
Architect: Robert M. Gurney, FAIA
Location: Lewes, Delaware

The starting point for this project is small house at 308 Mulberry Street, originally constructed in the early nineteenth-century in the heart of the historical district of Lewes. In the redesign, the exterior of the original structure is meticulously restored. A shed-roofed screened porch, storage room and poorly proportioned living space added to the back of the house in the early twentieth-century were removed. While the exterior of the original house is restored with historically correct detailing, the four new pavilions are crisply detailed, without overhangs and trim.

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  Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion

Category 3 Recipient
Architect: Robert M. Gurney, FAIA
Location: Bethesda, Maryland

Located in a neighborhood bordering Washington, DC, this suburban site has the advantage of being located adjacent to woodlands. A contemporary house surrounded by mature trees and manicured gardens anchors the site. A new swimming pool, stone walls, and terraces behind the house organize the rear yard and establish a dialogue between the existing house and a new pavilion. New paths, trees and structured plantings reinforce the geometry. The new pavilion, intended for year round use, provides a threshold between the structured landscape and adjacent woodland.

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  Tahoe City Transit Center

Category 3 Recipient
Architect: Wright Sherman; WRNS Studio
Location: Tahoe City, California

The Tahoe City Transit Center (TCTC) represents a vital step toward achieving a more sustainable transportation network within the region. Located in Tahoe City, California, at the gateway of North Lake Tahoe, the TCTC includes surface parking for 130 cars; a bus loop, built-in bicycle lockers; and a 1,100 sf transit facility with two restrooms, administrative space, and an enclosed waiting area accommodating up to 40 people. Designed to tread lightly on land, the form of the TCTC is strikingly modern, but also unmistakably of its place.

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  Four Eyes House

Category 4 Recipient
Architect: Edward Ogosta, AIA; Edward Ogosta Architecture
Location: Coachella Valley, California

A weekend desert residence for a small family, the Four Eyes House is an exercise in site-specific "experiential programming". Rather than planning the house according to a domestic functional program, the building was designed foremost as an instrument for intensifying particular onsite phenomenal events. Four "sleeping towers" orchestrate four spatiotemporal viewing experiences: morning sunrise (east), mountain range (south), evening city lights (west), and nighttime stars (zenith).

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