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The AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community (TAP) serves as a resource for AIA members, the profession, and the public in the deployment of computer technology in the practice of architecture. TAP leaders monitor the development of computer technology and its impact on architecture practice and the entire building life cycle, including design, construction, facility management, and retirement or reuse.

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Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

  • 1.  Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-27-2020 19:20
    Thought it might be of interest to share today´s subject of debate in the AEC world


    read on:

    https://www.aecmag.com/comment-mainmenu-36/2046-autodesk-aec-customers-demand-better-value?fbclid=IwAR3FSUa1MDyV-jkyzpvH-9AnAfBsvAWd4rlOhlRgR0FTBzNRsR7NUbmGCB8


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    Alex J. Nader - Intl. Assoc. AIA
    BIM Expert and Consultant l LEED Green Assoc.
    ARQPRO - Design, Architecture, BIM
    www.arqpro.net
    alex.nader@arqpro.net
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  • 2.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-29-2020 23:30
    No doubt it is not the first time Autodesk has heard this, however, it is the first time it has been made public and backed by RIBA...
    One could only assume that a large percentage of their development budget went into sales and marketing more so than improving the product.

    Some architects see "BIM" software like religion and will never change, however, the reality is: BIM software is a tool to get the job done, and clearly articulate the design intention to clients and downstream participants. Locking a business into one software package may be a short term feasible solution yet a long term mistake as better technology is available.

    The benefit of subscription-based software is; the choice of re-subscription is that of the end-user.

    I have no doubt that Architects globally will be taking the time out of their day to google VDC or Virtual Design & Construction Software and will find that better solutions are available.

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    Andrew Dwight
    Designer/BIM manager AAD Build
    BDM RubySketch
    Sydney Australia
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  • 3.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-30-2020 17:34
    I find it a bit frustrating that the argument is so narrow to just talk about which BIM software is better for the money.  Revit was a game changer when it first came out and then the other similar BIM softwares also tried to get a piece of the pie. 

    To me, this is an argument of Betamax vs. VHS tapes and we all know that DVD (or Digital) is the future.  BIM/VDC software is videotape in a world that is capable of playing DVD at this point and we need better than just a different flavor of videotape. 

    Where is the next Revit software that will lead to this revolution?  I haven't seen it yet.


    Nick Kovach





  • 4.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-31-2020 17:51
    Nick, You're a little confused on the timeline. Archicad was released in 1987. Revit didn't come out until 2000, 13 years later.

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    Richard Morrison, AIA
    Architect-Interior Designer
    Redwood City, CA
    www.richardmorrison.com
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  • 5.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-31-2020 18:19
    Okay, if you say so.. but that wasn't my point.. it's still another flavor of the same BIM software.  They are both software bridges from 2D CAD to 3D models that flatten back down to 2D drawings.  Over 20 years old..





  • 6.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 08-03-2020 19:46
    Good points Nick, yet we're further forward as DVDs have been replaced by BlueRay and BlueRay replaced was replaced by NetFlix. It's not a far stretch to predict that Revit could see itself in a Kodak Moment.

    Technology is like a car; if software vendors take their foot off the gas, their vehicle will slow and eventually stop. AutoDesk if you are listening reach out I can help.

    In my view Integrated Virtual Design & Construction (VDC) is where the early adopters are at right now, I did notice that some of the larger players have references to VDC on their websites, yet after an investigation, I found the time to learn and create was not a feasible option

    There are easier, faster, better tools out there for Architects and some continue where the others left off (VIA IFC). However, you'll have to dig through Google as the large marketing budgets of the three most prominent players keep the smaller, more agile tech providers on pages 2,3,4 to 10 in search results.

    There must be more behind the hollow shells delivered by traditional


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    Andrew Dwight
    Designer/BIM manager AAD Build
    BDM RubySketch
    Sydney Australia
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  • 7.  RE: Autodesk AEC customers demand better value

    Posted 07-31-2020 18:39
    Great article and I agree with many of their statements.   I started using 3D software in the late 80's while in college at OSU with a piece of software developed by SOM at the time (I think it was called AES), then upon graduation quickly moved into BIM using Bentley Triforma  in the early 90's and continued to transition to Bentley's various BIM versions until  finally for the last 7 years have been on Autodesk's Revit platform to join the "gorilla" in the industry.   Our main reason was the availability of content and hope for "better" Autocad interoperability and value and product development.  Instead experienced much of what the article has stated.

    Historically it seems the next evolution / paradigm of drawing software happens every 15 or so years (2D CAD to 3d surface modeling to 3d solid modeling to "Smart 3D" to BIM to Generative Components to VR to ? ... seems progress is more on visualization than drawing production and efficiencies through the entire AEC progress.

    What if an iPhone with Lidar using an AR type interface to in real time we were able to created our design and then transfer that to a constructor with a pair of "google type glass" that a constructor could wear and see exact what they are suppose to see while in the actual space / location .  The iPhone would sense surfaces and allow us to place new elements and "snap" to those surfaces?  I am able to put furniture using AR in a space using an IKEA app why can't the software Architects use not do more?

    It would be interesting to see if the magazine  would be willing to a survey US firms regarding the RIBA letter to see how many would agree with it and would be willing to sign a similar letter Autodesk from maybe the AIA?

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    William Thomas AIA
    Principal
    505 Architects LLC
    Tulsa OK
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