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Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

  • 1.  Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 02-02-2018 15:23

    With many of you in the Corporate Architect or Facility Management sector of our profession, do you foresee challenges when it comes to retaining and recruiting additional help or finding a successor?  To that end, what do you (or the companies you serve) see as the most challenging, and what seems to be working for you? 



    ------------------------------
    Robert Hartig AIA
    Medical Associates Clinic
    Dubuque IA
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 02-05-2018 18:31
    I wonder. At one time the AIA Corporate Architects Committee established scholarships for "non traditional Architectural practice" in a Florida University and curriculums were established to develop graduates specializing in non private practice careers. I do not know what ever became of the efforts of us establishing those scholarships.




  • 3.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 02-16-2018 09:46

    The CAFM Knowledge Community awarded two scholarships about four years ago.  Since then, AIA funding of these scholarships has discontinued.  It is up the each Knowledge Community to explore and determine the most effective (and feasible) way to encourage or spark interest in their sector of the profession.  Maybe it is story-telling....or your suggested importance of college connections?

     

    If some of our CAFM members already have a connection with these Colleges and Universities (especially those that have programs that promote or prepare students with an interest in a CAFM or non-traditional career path), we can benefit by hearing from you.  What has been tried (speaking to students at the colleges, job shadowing, career fairs, internships, etc.)?....and what seems to be working?  

     

    Bob Hartig AIA

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  • 4.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 02-21-2018 18:58
    This post is courtesy of Orlando Maione, FAIA (omaione@optonline.net):

    Just a suggestion. Since most members are connected to "corporations" someone should go after linking to corporate scholarships already in place for most large corporations.

    ------------------------------
    Edmond Gauvreau, FAIA
    Washington, DC
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-02-2018 11:47

    It makes a lot of sense to connect with various corporations....a question may be "when".  Some larger corporations, with licensed architects who are able to support an IDP program, would surely benefit from sponsoring a CAFM scholarship program....and recruiting talent right out of school.  For many CAFM Architects,  I suspect that IDP requirements for licensure led them to start out in a more traditional practice, and pursuing an interest or finding a niche in the CAFM side of the profession may have come sometime around or after licensure. 

     

    It would be interesting to hear from CAFM members on "when" they chose a CAFM career path. 

     

    Easy question #1: Before licensure?.....or After licensure? 

    Easy question #2: Did you have an interest in a CAFM career path as a student?  Yes....or....No

     

    If we get enough responses, we could tally and share results.....which may be of interest to many of you!

     

    Bob Hartig

    Director of Facilities and Plant Operations

    Medical Associates Clinic

    1000 Langworthy Street

    Dubuque, Iowa 52001

     

    563-584-3191

     

    CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original message.  The views expressed in this communication are that of the individual and shall not be construed as those of Medical Associates or any of its entities.





  • 6.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-06-2018 09:29
    ​I was one of the pioneers in the 1970s, before I had my license. Absolutely no interest during education, it wasn't an option or even mentioned as an employment opportunity. All my summer intern jobs were in established architectural offices until after college and military service. Then early positions were usually in corporate and institutional organizations in "Maintenance Depts", later "Facility Depts." and no titles even suggesting "architecture or draftsman"

    ------------------------------
    Orlando Maione FAIA, FACHA, NCARB
    Stony Brook NY
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  • 7.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-06-2018 11:52
    Had no interest as a student and certainly the decision to enter this world was after licensure. In fact after 21 years in private practice....

    Personal .02....I think you'd be doing a disservice to any young person thrusting them into a situation where they would have to make very important decisions financially and programmatically without any experience per say. Having a license doesn't necessarily insure that experience either (I've seen plenty of young architects that still can't put a building together properly or make major decisions in a timely manner) but time and experience does or most likely will. I personally think, in the position I'm in and have been in, in the CAFM world, that anyone coming into this world needs a minimum of 15 to 20 years practical experience...followed by a 2 to 5 year tutelage under someone that has been in the CAFM world. Yes you can "grow" into a position such as this I'm in, we're in, but to what ends, to what damage do you do for your corporation......I'm sure that there are plenty out there that would disagree with that synopsis, and that's fine, no need to start a big email dissertation, besides that's why they make Chevrolets and Cadillac's...

    On Tue, Mar 6, 2018 at 8:29 AM, Orlando Maione via The American Institute of Architects



    --
    David R Proffitt, AIA, CSI, CDT
    CCCA, KYCID, LEED AP





  • 8.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-07-2018 18:58

    The majority of architects who I know are Corporate Architects have often moved into the position from general practice.  I am not aware of university programs with an emphasis in programs which leads this field. 

     

    William M. Reeves, AIA

    Partner

     

    Marmon Mok Architecture

    700 N. St. Mary's, # 1600

    San Antonio, TX 78205

    T  210-223-9492

    marmonmok.com

     

    Design. Done.

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  • 9.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-09-2018 12:08
    ​Hi - First time responding so bear with me. Graduated with BArch in 1978 - no work at firms at the time but got a job with the NPS as Historical Architect. Ended up working the next 40 years for owners, mainly higher ed (public and private) - being their project advocate in master planning, space planning, development of project budgets and funding, designer selection, community communication, constructor selection, project management, move-in, and then coordinating facility renewal. So, long answer is that I never planned to work as a corporate architect but found that I had more freedom and responsibility sooner than I may have otherwise had, and was able to thread a satisfying career, which was happily recently recognized by being admitted to the College of Fellows!

    ------------------------------
    Edward H Adelman FAIA
    Executive Director
    Massachusetts State College Building Authority
    Boston MA
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:40

    No one at my University in the late 70's knew anything about Corporate Architects. My senior year, my uncle who owned a masonry company  was working on major project in New York City. He told me that at the job conference meetings  the design firm architect attended and the Corporate Architect who represented the company who would own the building attended. That spring Armstrong World Industries was interviewing on my Campus and went to see what it was all about. They made me an offer with a salary, benefits and pension. I accepted the job and worked for the for 12 years become a Senior Architect in the company before leaving. I learn many management skills related to project cost, schedule, and quality that I still use today. Not ever architectural graduate is a designer!

     

    Keith Falco

     

    <a href=image001.png@01D2E8D7.438A3770">

     

    Keith G. Falco, A.I.A., NCARB

    Principal Architect, Industrial Market Sector

    Suite 28

    1853 William Penn Way

    PO Box 10368

    Lancaster, PA 17605

    T: (717) 205-4293

    C: (717) 368.1198

    kfalco@bucharthorn.com

    Check us out at www.bucharthorn.com

     






  • 11.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-09-2018 18:41

    Thank you to those who have joined the conversation so far....your feedback is helpful....and not surprising. 

     

    We are learning that for many (not all), a CAFM career path came sometime after licensure.  And, as students, a CAFM career path was really an unknown.  Feedback also suggests that CAFM knowledge, experience, and expertise is something that we have gained over a longer career run.  This tends to support that the past AIA CAFM student scholarship program may not have been an effective way to advance CAFM interest or to tell our story.....so....any ideas on a more effective way to do that?

     

    Regards,

     

    Bob Hartig AIA

    Director of Facilities and Plant Operations

    Medical Associates Clinic

    Dubuque, Iowa 52001

     

     

    CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original message.  The views expressed in this communication are that of the individual and shall not be construed as those of Medical Associates or any of its entities.





  • 12.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-12-2018 17:41
    Hello all. I am new to this world, having moved to a position with the Judiciary from private practice last year. It has been wonderful. I find it to play to my strengths of project management and the understanding and management of the complex projects and multiple user groups.  I had 25 years of experience in private practice before I came to this work and I needed every bit of it.  

    How do we tell our story? Our state architecture program has a professional practice class in 5th year that dedicates one class time to alternative careers. I will go this year to represent "government/corporate." In the past they've also had furniture designers, health department architects, etc. I think that helps students understand it isn't a zero sum game if they someday find they want something different than a traditional practice. It would be interesting if the AIA did a piece every quarter or something on architects in non-traditional work. Even, gasp, if they aren't AIA members.


    Pamela D Leonard, NCARB
    District Architect
    U. S. District Court





  • 13.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-13-2018 19:55
    I have been an Architect and a member of AIA for I don't know how many years. I was one of the original members of the "Architects In Industry" prior to the name change to "Corporate Architect Committee". (Lots of us had no involvement in industrial projects.)

    We met four times a year, originally meeting at AIA Headquarters in Washington, DC. Then we wised up, realizing that we came from all parts of the US so decided that we could meet anywhere in the US....more "friendly" climates than Washington in the hear of summer or the dampness of winter. We did agree that one of the four meetings would be at AIA headquarters, and a 5th meeting would be our "Conference" where one of the members would be responsible, at their site, to provide interesting and educational..to us, activities. 

    This allowed us to experience a number of really neat experiences in a number of neat places... i.e. FLW Falling Waters, etc. Also San Diego in winter, or Phoenix, etc. 

    I had been in private practice for five or six years when I was offered a job at 3M in St Paul, MN. Back then there was a definite prejudice against non-traditional architectural practice. I had been quite active in the AIA in Iowa prior to joining 3M and remember the first AIA meeting I attended in St Paul. Everyone seemed very friendly, until I said I was working for 3M...suddenly I was given the cold shoulder. There was only one fellow who was friendly. I volunteered for a committee, but was never told when they would meet.

    That was then...since then things have become quite and very different. I am still a member of the AIA, have served numerous officer positions and have always had a very close relationship to the MSAIA staff and administration. I have now been retired for 19 years, but still have many good memories of my times of Architecture. .I do maintain my registration.

    And I miss the Corporate Architects Committee...i had some very good friends from that group..Corning Glass,AT&T, IE Lilly, Bell Telephones..several of them, IBM, Westinghouse, National Bureau of Standards, Walgreen's, etc. etc. At that time active members  had to be employed by Corporations or Government organizations. Some private practitioners were allowed for our "conferences".

    Our committee had quite a bit of "clout" because we had quite a bit of money...we would decide to do something and then we would do it, sometimes telling the AIA that we didn't need the approval we were going to do it and pay for it ourselves. That also involved the establishment of a scholarship for the training of non traditional architectural practice at a school in Florida.
    Oh, those "good old days".  





  • 14.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-12-2018 21:21
    Great topic. The CAFM industry as you call it is alive and well, thriving with young college graduates with varying degrees, becoming very successful working with clients in retail, corporate, industrial, public and higher education/healthcare markets.

    My journey began in 1984 at TVA when we acquired a CAFM application that set my future for the following 34 years. We now have a practice of 130 that implement applications for real estate, space management, maintenance and operations, capital projects and energy management. The applications are used by thousands of companies managing billions of square feet across the globe.

    The AIA tried to facilitate this effort with the publication of the 13th edition of the Handbook of Professional Practice.

    Bottom line, we could use more architects in this business. Young and old.

    Robin M. Ellerthorpe, FAIA
    312.375.7274





  • 15.  RE: Striking a relevant CAFM conversation #1:

    Posted 03-30-2018 18:25

    Thank you for your responses to "Striking a relevant CAFM conversation#1"!

     

    Many comments, stories, and snapshots of interesting and positive career experiences!  We are learning that we have a lot of AIA CAFM members with a pretty broad range of experience and expertise!  Maybe it is the story-telling that is the best way to invite and promote interest in a CAFM career path. 

     

    Let's create a collection of "brief" one-liners (career observations and advice from our CAFM members) tied to various aspects of our CAFM careers?  Maybe these comments would be a great way to better "connect" with each other, our fellow professionals, and our emerging professionals; and the top five or so in each (eventual) category can become part of an electronic CAFM brochure for college and university students as well as content on our CAFM website!  

     

    OK, there are around 6000 AIA CAFM members......so do spill your guts!.....would love to hear from you!  

     

    If you are on board, let's challenge ourselves to 10 words or less....and start with.....

     

    What have you found to be the most rewarding or exciting element of your CAFM career path?  (changing the "subject line" above so we can keep your responses sorted out by question/topic!)

     

    Regards,

     

    Bob Hartig AIA

     

    CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original message.  The views expressed in this communication are that of the individual and shall not be construed as those of Medical Associates or any of its entities.