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AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

  • 1.  AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-23-2020 17:21

    I just received an email from Architectural Record.   The top headline was:   "420 Reasons your Grow House Needs Better Security".     Based upon a documentary that I viewed last night,  I can name more than a few. 

     

    Can you believe that one can now get AIA HSW credits for learning how to design a secure cannabis grown house?    I guess learning the technical aspects might be safer than hiring the Cartel as a consultant.   They might not like the competition.   I do not believe that the profession should be directly or indirectly facilitating recreational drug use any more than we should be supporting the tobacco industry. 

     

     

    Bill T. Wilson II, FAIA, NCARB

    Vice President/Principal

    WKMC Architects, Inc.

    (361) 561-2125 – Direct

    (361) 887-6696 – Main Line

    909 S. Tancahua Street

    Corpus Christi, Texas 78404

    www.WKMCarchitects.com

     

    WKMC-Logo-Color for mini-site

     



  • 2.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-24-2020 17:40
    Bill,
    The 2019 Conference on Design had several sessions regarding design of facilities for growing/producing cannabis. Regardless of your personal opinion about the legalization of cannabis, it is indeed legal in a number of states.  In MD, the state issued several licenses for the legal production - someone has to design those facilities.  Maybe not for you, but another AIA member will take up the challenge.
    Ed

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    Edmond Gauvreau, FAIA
    Washington, DC
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  • 3.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-24-2020 18:09
    Architects design wineries, no? And brewpubs? And distilleries?

    One generation's prohibition is another's preference. The times, they are a-changin'.

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    Richard Buday FAIA
    Archimage, Inc.
    Houston TX
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  • 4.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-24-2020 18:53

    Edmond,

    I am breathlessly awaiting the first design awards for the most sustainable and secure cannabis grow house.........................on a parallel note,   I have yet to see an award winning design or an article on best practices  for the design of  a brothel!.  Although,  I understand that prostitution is legal in certain parts of the country as well.    I personally don't see the design of either type of facility as "taking up the challenge".   Just because something is legal does not mean it is either desirable or ethical.    Cheers!

     

    Bill T. Wilson II, FAIA, NCARB

    Vice President/Principal

    WKMC Architects, Inc.

    (361) 561-2125 – Direct

    (361) 887-6696 – Main Line

    909 S. Tancahua Street

    Corpus Christi, Texas 78404

    www.WKMCarchitects.com

     

    WKMC-Logo-Color for mini-site

     






  • 5.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-25-2020 19:27
    Response from Hawaii,

    This would be good building type to establish design standards. Hawaii has already licensed quite a few growers. But I am dismayed because HI law requires cannabis be grown INDOORS for security. This is a shame in a state that has so much sunshine and mild weather. Not to mention some national "ill-repute" for growing some of the best in USA! I am the AIA lobbyist in HI, and I think the law should have required secure facility not necessarily “indoors.” “Bonded greenhouse” would have been my preferred statutory language; and we develop design standards for this. Of course, it could still be grown indoors. Using anti-terrorist design standards might work; such as security bars inside ductwork and roof parapet. “Bonded greenhouse” would also imply staffing regulation.

    Dan Chun, FAIA
    AIA Hawaii Government Affairs Commissioner




  • 6.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-25-2020 15:36
    Bill,
    A few years ago I lead a design team to produce one of the first “grow houses” in the northeast — in Connecticut for a firm called Curaleaf. It was big — over 20,000 sq. ft. with planned capability to double that. By my reckoning the major problem it presented to society was the absurdly large energy demand. So any training that can be given to reduce the carbon footprint of these places is certainly worth rewarding.

    On further reflection though, the best solution to reducing the carbon footprint related to producing this crop might be to have states in the sunbelt legalize (medical) marijuana and then develop secure ways of growing it in sunshine.




  • 7.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-25-2020 18:00
    True that the growing, processing, sale and distribution of marijuana within state lines is legal in many states, it still remains a violation of federal law.   The AIA Code of Ethics Canon II says in part "Members should uphold the law in the conduct of their professional activities". This marijuana issue is a real grey area for states, people in all facets of this industry, and in our profession.  Until such time as Congress addresses this mater head on at the federal level, and gets in line with the growing list of states who have legalized recreational and medical marijuana, the AIA really should take some action to clarify the conflict with the Code of Ethics in this particular regard, or stop including programs of this nature in AIA National sanctioned events and publications.

    Bill Seider, FAIA
    Eugene, Oregon


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    William Seider FAIA
    Senior Architect
    PIVOT Architecture
    Eugene OR
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  • 8.  RE: AIA Health Safety & Welfare Credits

    Posted 03-25-2020 18:08
    For what it's worth, I as a peer reviewer had the chance to review several proposals for such facilities.  I did question the validity of including those sessions at the Convention - obviously last year at Vegas (and I believe for A'20, whenever that occurs).  I agree with Bill Seider that this is still a very murky area for practice.  For me, if I continue to be a peer reviewer and get such sessions for evaluation, I will probably caveat any ratings I give those sessions, if any at all.  As far as Congress is concerned, it will take several more years and a powerflush of many current members to bring science and reason to the discussion versus fear and fake news.