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The AAJ Courthouse POE Toolkit - What You’ll Receive Erin Persky, Associate AIA, CCHP   The Toolkit includes: An introduction to post-occupancy evaluations and the goals of this Courthouse Post-Occupancy Evaluation Toolkit. (The first article in this POE series also goes into detail about the origins and purposes of the Toolkit as it pertains to best practices.)  https://network.aia.org/academyofarchitectureforjustice/blogs/erin-costino/2017/09/17/a-poe-toolkit-for-courthouses?CommunityKey=6cb91d7c-05dc-4b48-97ea-b36b6034093e&tab= For users who would like to assess energy and environmental performance, ambient conditions such as acoustics ...
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Report from AIA AAJ Fall Conference 2018: Jersey City, NJ Tour:  The Red Hook Community Justice Center - Innovative Problem-Solving Courts at the Community Level  By:  Jacob Matthias Kummer   A few weeks ago (in November)  participants of the 2018 AAJ Fall Conference had the opportunity to visit the Red Hook Community Justice Center, the nation's first multi-jurisdictional community court. The Justice Center is a collaborative effort of Brooklyn’s District Attorney’s Office, the Center for Court Innovation, and the Office of Court Administration.  The experimental, problem-solving court takes a restorative approach to justice using sanctions ...
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Report from AIA AAJ Fall Conference 2018: Jersey City, NJ Roundtable Session:  Evidence-Based Design Approaches - Mentally Ill Offenders: Who is “My Keeper”?  By:  Jacob Matthias Kummer   Speakers: Laura Maiello-Reidy, Brett Firfer, Assoc. AIA, Richard Wener, PhD, Kevin Murrett, AIA, Elizabeth Ford, PhD.   The National Alliance on Mental Health estimates more than 2 million arrests in the US involve people with serious mental illnesses. Mental health and access to treatment is the number 1 challenge facing corrections today. Solutions need to coordinate appropriate treatment, and provide the right physical environment ...
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  Communications Committee Seasoned Professional Profile of Larry Hartman, AIA     Personal Information:   AAJ: What is your favorite piece of architecture?   LH: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater.  The integration with the site, the arrival/entry sequence, and the sense of scale and comfort are wonderful.  The extensive hand-drawings are delight.   AAJ: When did you first know that you wanted to be an architect?   LH: When I first learned there was such a profession, I wanted to be an architect.  My mother saved tiny drawings of houses I made starting at the age of four.    Why Justice?   ...
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It was great to see so many people at the AAJ Fall Conference in Jersey City this year!   Technically, this is our last journal of 2018!  We are calling this Q3 as we skipped our usual fall publication, however, this issue will make up for it.  I’ll tell you how now: First, we will focus on our latest Seasoned Professional, Mr. Larry Hartman.  I had the pleasure working with Larry on the AAJ Communications Committee for the past few years and he was a most generous colleague.  Larry who is recently retired, had a 36-year career focused on justice issues, he has planned and designed a wide range of complex projects including major prisons, large detention centers, ...
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by Sarah Paddick B.Arch St, B.Arch FRAIA “brutal…” “my first night in prison…hard concrete bed and shitty mattress…” “noisy, hot and smelly…or freezing” “no privacy…” “why does it have to be so ugly?”   These are all comments from female prisoners who have lived in the mainstream block at the Adelaide Women’s Prison which is the main secure facility for women in South Australia, accommodating around 200 female offenders of all security classifications.    Figure 1. Google Earth view of Adelaide Women’s Prison, with the Mainstream Accommodation block indicated in red. This block was built in the late 1960’s and provides around 60 beds ...
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by Judge Celeste F. Bremer, US Magistrate Judge, Emily Gloe Donovan, RA, Susan Oldroyd, FAIA, LEED, Kristina Kobulsky, RA, LEED AP Buildings Express Values:  Which design elements read ‘male or female’ and why   When the question of “gendered” courthouses is presented to architects, the initial reaction is that good design is not, and should not be, gendered.  However, working through the exercise at the presentation at the AIA AAJ October 2017 Conference, trying to define male and female traits, and how they are represented in justice design, allowed us to take a deeper look into elements of design needed for a new courthouse for today’s citizens and ...
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by Kerry Feeney B.E.S., B. Arch, MAA, LEED AP When we hear the words “accused”, “offender” or “convict” our mind’s-eye typically pictures a man—whereas age, race, background and other specifics are often more diversely represented in our imaginings of a “bad guy”.  The difference seems to depend on our individual experiences and environment, but what about sex?  Who we almost never picture when we hear these words are: “women” [1] . As a woman, I am guilty of this as well.  A few years ago, we took a break from creating contract documents for the Women’s Correctional facility we were working on, to tour a police station.   It was a quiet morning and ...
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Personal Information: Where did you go to college? KD:         University of Kentucky   What degrees did you earn? KD:         Bachelor of Architecture   When did you first know that you wanted to be an architect? KD:         In high school when I researched careers and shadowed an architect in Louisville, KY. Experience: How did you become involved in the justice market? KD:         I was working for Brandstetter Carroll Inc. in Lexington, KY and worked on several county jails and courthouses.   What was the first justice project that you worked on? KD:         The Kenton County Detention Center ...
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Letter from the Chair Summer is here and so is our 2nd quarter journal of 2018! This issue is a special edition on gender with a focus on women. We hope you enjoy this latest effort to bring relevant and thought-provoking articles to the justice community. As always, we want to hear from you and further understand your interests. First, we will focus on our latest Emerging Professional, Katherine Dixon. Ms. Dixon is Director Division of Capital Construction and Facilities Maintenance Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. She is not a traditional emerging professional, she is an architect with years of experience, but this is a newer role. ...
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Letter from the Chair Welcome to our first quarter journal publication of 2018!  Spring is here, and the Communications Committee is ready to inform and dialogue with the AIA AAJ membership.  We've started the year off strong with this issue. First, we will focus on our latest emerging professional, Graham Vickers.  He practices on the west coast—in Portland specifically—and has some salient things to say about our challenges and aspirations as justice professionals. As always, we are happy to introduce our latest Advisory Group member.  This year we are pleased to welcome Erica Loynd to the table. She is likely not a stranger to most of you, as she ...
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This Committee continues to be one of the best attended of the Conference and this past January’s meeting in Orlando was no exception. For the past three years, we have been fortunate to have Larry Hartman from HDR serve as our Chairman and he has facilitated discussion on a wide range of topics that impact our profession. One topic that has been discussed at the last two meetings is the idea of maintaining human dignity and a modicum of privacy in multi-occupancy cells by screening (even enclosing) the toilet. Our discussion acknowledged that other Western nations have long recognized this basic right through the innovative approaches to creating a separate ...
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The Justice Institute at the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, Planning    TO:                       AAJ Membership FROM:                 April Pottoroff, FAIA, Chair-University Outreach Committee Survey Link:        https://www.research.net/r/VRV56TV     Introduction In July of 2016 the University of Kansas (KU) School of Architecture + Design (Arc/D) launched its first “Institute” program: The “Institute for Health + Wellness Design” (IHWD).  With planning underway, KU|Arc/D is gearing up to start the Institute on Entertainment and Sports Design (IESD).   KU|Arc/D is very interested in collaborating with us to start a ...
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By Erin Persky, Assoc. AIA   In the previous article of this series, I provided a snapshot of preparation and on-site recommendations for successfully completing the Courthouse Staff and Visitor Surveys. Over the past few months, I've received several emails from individuals interested in using the Toolkit (thank you! I'm so glad you're interested!) inquiring about findings – "what do the findings look like?" "do you have examples of results?" In this article I provide examples of findings from the POE pilot report for each survey. (Identifiable information has been changed or removed to protect the identity of the courthouse at which the POE pilot was ...
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A way of thinking about inclusive courthouse design Parts I & II Judge Celeste F. Bremer, US Magistrate Judge Emily Gloe Donovan, RA Susan Oldroyd, FAIA, LEED Kristina Kobulsky, RA, LEED AP   Beyond the Blindfold:  New Ways of Seeing Justice At a recent AIA AAJ Conference, we were invited to challenge the participants by asking them to re-think their approaches to traditional courthouse design:  columns, volume, circulation, and expressions of strength, power and formality through site, material and icons. Through a lively discussion, we shared our premise:  Courts are Gendered, and that Gender is Male . One of the ways that the ...
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Erica Loynd, AIA   What are you most passionate about in regards to Justice Architecture? EL: As my career has developed with projects and research, justice architecture has taken on a strong passion in my everyday. Seeing how the owners are craving this change and just don’t even know where to begin makes me see architecture as the tie between operational change and building change. Neither can work independently … if you make a building that is beautiful and normative but operated in the traditional sense, it will never succeed in making the change. Owners who understand that hire architects to help envision the future and see us as more than just ...
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Personal Information What is your favorite piece of architecture? GV:        The Seattle Public Library is always my short answer to this question.  It’s a very cool building as a whole, but it was the interior experience/ progression that has really stuck with me.   What degrees did you earn and at what college? GV:        B-Arch, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute   When did you first know that you wanted to be an architect? GV:        I made the decision in the 6 th grade and never strayed. Experience What firm do you work for and how long have you been with your current firm? GV:        SMRT Architects and Engineers, ...
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By Erica Loynd and Bob Schwartz, co-chairs to the Sustainable Justice Committee   John Swain photographer, courtesy HOK Implementing sustainable features in buildings has frequently been equated with additional cost, maintenance and complexity.  As sustainable initiatives evolve, features accentuating human interaction with the built environment are taking priority. Justice facilities are taking advantage of these attributes and the benefits they have to offer for the owner, staff, and detainees. Post occupancy surveys and statistics indicate these facilities contribute to decreases in staff sick days and turnover rates as well as reductions in recidivism ...
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Erin Persky, Associate AIA, CCHP    In the last article, I introduced the American Institute of Architects – Academy of Architecture for Justice (AIA-AAJ) Courthouse Post-Occupancy Toolkit, including data collection instruments and goals for Toolkit use. This article will expand on the importance of POE Toolkit data collection for the advancement of best practices in courthouse design. Justice architecture professionals often lament the lack of research specific to justice environments. We look to workplace, healthcare, and non-justice civic research for evidence-based design strategies to apply to our projects (I’m a big fan of Charles T. Goodsell’s ...
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By the AAJ Communications Committee   How did you join the Leadership Group? LL: Joining the leadership group came in the form of a surprise call from Liz Minnis. She called, said hello, and then asked if I knew why she was calling. Since I was waist deep in my responsibilities as chair of the JFR, I assumed it was because I had missed a deadline. I think my response was something like “Am I late on a deliverable?” Liz just laughed and then invited me to be part of the group.   I was honored because so many people I hold in high regard have served on the group. I had previously served as chair of the San Francisco Bay Area component of the ...
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