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Letter from the editor Welcome to our first Journal of 2017!  We are off to a great start and I think this year promises to be particularly engaging.  We have a great committee, with fantastic ideas and focus, that we will share with you throughout the next few months.   First, we continue our segments on getting to know some emerging professionals in the field.  This time we get to meet Kristina Koblusky. She is an impassioned lead designer, working towards licensure, with a drive to help people, communities and the environment.  My thanks to Kristina for taking the time out of her busy life to share her honest thoughts with us. In this issue, we address ...
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By the AAJ Communications Committee Personal information: How do you like to spend your free time? KK: I am currently working on my architectural license which is a time intensive process, so any true free time is usually planned well ahead. When time allows, I enjoy hiking or just getting outdoors. There are several trails close to where I live and I enjoy short hikes on the weekends. Once or twice a year, my husband and I take time off and go off to mountains to conquer the more intense trails. There is something special about the vast, serene, and open panoramas that the mountains offer. I cannot get enough of their energy and beauty. ...
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By Jim Beight, AIA, LEED AP   Courthouses have long served as the centers of community throughout the world, playing an instrumental role in civic identity and continuity. These important buildings have served to connect governments with their citizens while symbolizing the noble tradition of enduring justice. Despite this grand mission, courthouses as a facility type have often fallen short in terms of providing a user-friendly experience for the general public. The 2015 State of the State Courts survey, conducted by the National Center for State Courts, found that only 41 percent of respondents in the U.S. rated courts as good or excellent when ...
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 By the AAJ Communications Committee Experience: What are you most passionate about in regards to justice architecture?  GC:  What I am most drawn to is the opportunity to influence lives in a positive way by providing design solutions that support rehabilitation and re-entry into society. The expectations of our criminal justice system are changing, and I’m excited to work with the talented architects that are leading the response from the design community. What firm do you work for and how long have you been with your current firm? GC:  I have worked for HOK for 10 years. I was in St. Louis for 8 years before joining the Chicago ...
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By Laurence E. Hartman, AIA, NCARB, CCHP   The winter conference of the American Correctional Association (ACA) was held January 20-24, 2017 in sunny San Antonio, Texas.  Many AAJ members are active with ACA, principally with committees such as International Corrections, Sustainability, and Facility Planning and Design (of which I have been re-appointed chair for a second two year term). The Facility Planning and Design Committee meeting includes 25-30 industry members representing the architecture community along with federal, state, and local agencies (of which there has been increasing participation).  The committee role within ACA is multi-faceted: ...
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By the AAJ Communications Committee Personal Information: When did you know, you wanted to be an Architect? FM: The interest began at six years old, when I graduated from Lincoln Logs to an Erector set. At eleven years old, a scholarship to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago provided exposure to Chicago architecture on a weekly basis. At fifteen years old, a trip around the world on a freighter provided exposure to both landmark and anonymous architecture in 30 different countries. By then I knew I wanted to be an Architect. Where did you go to college and what degrees did you earn? FM: University of Illinois, ...
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The Honolulu Conference

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By Stephen A. Carter One of the two tour groups on Friday of the conference The Academy was wise to choose a location for the 2016 conference as far away from Washington DC as geographically possible. For three or four days, we focused on the excellent panel discussions, distracted only by the call of ocean breezes and temperate waters. Of course on return to the Mainland, a tsunami in US politics occurred, but at least we were relaxed! The four plenary and 17 panel sessions represented what AAJ has come to expect from the speakers and the audience participation. The Academy has truly evolved into a community of professionals who ...
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By Laurence E. Hartman, AIA, CCHP; Gregory Cook, AIA, CCHP; Erin Persky, Assoc. AIA, CCHP This article begins with a discussion of existing standards for correctional health care facilities, including strengths, weakness, and their applicability to modern correctional environments. Following this discussion is a description of an initiative by the National Commission on Correctional Healthcare (NCCHC) and the authors toward the development of correctional health care facility design guidelines that will be made available to architects and planners. Existing Standards By Laurence E. Hartman, AIA, CCHP Correctional agencies are dealing ...
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By the AAJ Communications Committee Experience How did you get involved in the Justice Market? LB: The first corrections project I worked on was in 1991. It was a medical, mental health, geriatric facility for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, the first of its kind in Texas. I was assigned as Project Architect during a time when assignments were given based on who was available when the project was awarded, not on whether someone had experience with that particular project type. I had worked for several years on hotels, and it took me a while to stop calling the cells guest rooms. I didnt work on another justice project ...
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Letter from the editor Thank you for taking the time to read our fourth quarter issue of the AIA AAJ Journal. This is our last issue for 2016 and it has been a successful and rewarding year. I would like to thank the AIA and everyone on the Communications Committee, for a job well done and for always coming forward with great ideas, journal articles and themes. First up in this issue, we have an inspiring and insightful interview with Fred Moyer. Mr. Moyer has profoundly influenced justice architecture thinking and touched the way we work on our diverse projects. But that is not enough; Fred Moyer is a progressive thinker and reminds us of future issues ...
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By Steven E Loomis, FAIA, LEED AP Police have received much negative press in recent times regarding the use of excessive and even deadly force. These seemingly uncommon yet alarming incidents have sparked national debate and even riots over how police are trained, police racial profiling and when use of force is appropriate and necessary. While these issues cannot be solved directly through new facilities, they can be addressed in a revamped training regimen that is then translated into an architectural program and response. As a follow up to the presentation developed last fall at the AAJ Conference and presented by AAJ Members, Brian Super, ...
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by Dwight Mitsunaga Please join us at our annual 2016 Academy of Architecture for Justice National Conference in Hawaii. Well all be meeting at the Modern Honolulu Hotel in Waikiki on November 2-5. This years theme, Aloha! Sharing Justice Architecture Best Practices , focuses on bringing out successful ideas and approaches to designing, constructing and managing efficient, economical, safe and desirable courts, detention/corrections and law enforcement facilities. Our opening plenary will be a welcome, and a meet and greet with Hawaiis justice leaders; Hawaiis Lieutenant Governor, the Honorable Shan Tsutsui; Hawaiis Chief Justice, the Honorable ...
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Restrictive Housing

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Included here within is a very important statement on Restrictive Housing by the American Correctional Association. The text of the initial letter to members is available below for the full 5 page document, please see the images below. For further information and context please refer to the American Correctional Association Restrictive Housing Performance Based Standards - August 2016 located on the ACA website (69 pages). American Correctional Association 206 N. Washington Street, Suite 200 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-224-0000 www.aca.org August 23, 2016 To ACA Members, As you know, we recently concluded our 146th Congress of Correction ...
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We call them the Leadership Group, and together they work hard to lead the AAJ into the future, keeping us relevant and organized. But what about them individually? In this issue, we have taken the opportunity to ask them separately about the value ofand their experience atthe Knowledge Leadership Assembly (KLA), a gathering of leaders from many of the AIA communities. Amy Finlayson This was my first opportunity to attend KLA as an incoming member of the AAJ Leadership Group. I went in unsure of what was in store, and the AIA did not disappoint. The conference for 2016 was held in Washington DC and had a large turnout. The KLA discussion groups ...
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Personal Information: When did you know you wanted to be an Architect? RB: In my sophomore year in high school I was influenced by my best friend Bill Bishop to pursue architecture. Bill attended a different high school than I, and he was involved in an architectural program at his school, which was not offered at my high school. I found architecture and the whole program totally fascinating. We became roommates in college, got our architectural registration at the same time, and have remained friends to this day. Where did you go to college and what degrees did you earn? RB: The University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, and received ...
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Thank you for reading the Academy for Architecture for Justice Journal: Third Quarter Issue of 2016! Firstly, we have a letter from our Conference Chair, Dwight Mitsunaga inviting us to the next AIA-AAJ conference in Honolulu, Hawaii! The keynote speakers are distinguished and inspiring, the track chairs have curated interesting and educational sessions, the sustainable workshop is a go, the hotel looks beautiful and the setting cant be beat. On November 2-5, 2016, get set to say aloha! Second, we have an interview with Ron Budzinski, who recently retired as National Director of Criminal Justice Architecture for PSA Dewberry Architects. In the interview, ...
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By Xenia Cox Across both the private and public sectors, large-scale systemic reform efforts that pivot around performance metrics and outcomes are a New Normal. Assessing outcomes through a quantitative and qualitative lens, and evaluating the contribution of individual personnel and collective staff to those outcomes, has become integral to systems level change that is founded in research and driven by large and small data with a goal of greater accountability. There is economics logic behind this thinking – roughly and typically half of an organization's budget is allocated to personnel salaries and, as such, holding staff accountable for outcomes ...
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Juvenile Facilities Offer Vocational Programs to Engage Youths, Reduce Repeat Offenses and Offer Opportunity Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice Youth Preparatory Academy Partnering State Technical Schools on Vocational Training Academy By Karen Sicner, AIA Four years after a sweeping overhaul of Georgia's criminal justice system which included extensive reforms in juvenile justice, we are seeing more momentum towards achieving one of that initiative's goals to reduce recidivism among youth offenders, including vocational training and community partnerships offering training and skills to prepare them for life outside the criminal justice ...
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By Stacey Wiseman, AIA and Katherine Dixon, AIA The Baltimore Youth Detention Center (YDC) is designed for Juveniles who have been charged as adults. Due to their sentence and their age, they cannot be housed with either adults or juveniles not charged as adults. The design of this facility is similar to other juvenile facilities with continued access to primary education, counseling and treatment for mental health and substance abuse issues. The chief initiative of this facility is to provide a less institutional setting and programming to help youths housed here to repurpose their life for successful re-entry to society. Currently, this project ...
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Personal Information: What is your favorite piece of architecture? BM: I don't have a favorite architectural building; I tend to admire or focus on certain building elements that stand out – like a well detailed limestone façade or clean line or the way the light plays on a façade or created patterns on the interior. Where did you go to college? BM: I went to Illinois Central College (a local community college in Peoria, IL) and transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for my Bachelor degree. Currently, I am attending Southern Illinois University full time for my Masters of Architecture while working full time. What ...
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