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Topic: Submissions for New Book

Stephen D. Dunakoskie AIA

1.  Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-27-2012 18:25
I looked through the rules of this forum and I believe this is permissible. If not, I apologize. I was looking for a way to get this request out to as many residential architects as possible.

I am looking for projects to feature in my next book, Designing Your Perfect Small House. My first book has been quite successful. But I get notes from many readers asking for information about designing a small to moderately sized house. I would like to share the exposure with other architects. So I am looking for good, small projects to use as illustrations and examples. If your project(s) is(are) chosen for inclusion, credits will appear on any photos or drawings. Also, your name and contact information will be listed on a special page of contributors. Selected contributors will not receive monetary compensation. But they will benefit from the exposure through the book's circulation. Contributors will be given two free copies and a deep discount (essentially at cost) if they wish to buy more copies for their own use. I do not wish to profit from sales of books to contributors.

I am particularly interested in projects that "look like houses." By that I mean projects that fit into established neighborhoods, conjure up the image of home for the majority of society, and place a strong emphasis on the psychological comfort of the owners and residents. Modernist houses are ceratinly welcomed. They help illustrate the full spectrum of what architects do. But my goal is to also help people who like traditional homes (and other styles) do a better job of designing modestly sized homes better than what is typically available on the market. The bottom line is I want good looking houses that are efficiently laid out and well built.

As in my first book, Designing Your Perfect House, I will strongly encourage people to use an architect, even if they merely hire an architect to help guide them and critique standard plans they may be considering. I believe it is in our best interest and in the best interest of the community to get architects involved in any way possible. The more people know about what goes into a good design and what we architects do, the better for all of us.

If you have projects you would like to submit for consideration, let me know. You can send me an email directly at hirschnc@nc.rr.com. Photos, plans, and an explanation of your design intent will be required if your project is selected. But an informal submission is all I need right now. Also, feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Thanks.
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William Hirsch AIA
ARCHITECT
William J Hirsch, Jr Inc
West End NC
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2.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-28-2012 08:36
Hello William, I think you are probably not going to find many sympathetic architects to your endeavor.  Because, you are guiding the way for people to not use architects, even though you indicate that you suggest that they do.  Sort of like handing people a box of tools and telling them how to fix their own car, which can be fraught with problems.  Not too mention the fact that this forum is about and for residential architects designing homes for people.  Also the CRAN and AIA and other licensed architectural organizations are here to help protect the Health, Safety & Welfare of the public.  Suggesting that people do it themselves is also like handing people a medical bag and offering suggestions as to how to perform their own heart surgery. I'm not in favor of this.  I think it will at first appear to empower people, but ultimately will likely confuse and frustrate them, and at worst, result in many missed and uncoordinated details that result in huge problems for their structure, systems, waterproofing, energy and other aspects.  Not wise, in my opinion. 

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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3.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-28-2012 18:13
Rand;

I understand your concern about do-it-yourselfers. But I can tell from the experience and response I've gotten to my first book, Designing Your Perfect House, that the majority of readers are actually overwhelmed by what goes into a good house design. It convinces them that they have little hope of trying it themselves. Sure, there are those people who are looking for a step-by-step manual to lead them through designing their house. In fact, the one and only one-star review my book got on amazon.com came from someone who was disappointed that I did not provide the hand holding he expected. My many five-star reviews say things like "this puts into words what I have always felt about good houses." And "This book is invaluable to anyone who is planning on building their dream house."

The theme of my books is this. I try to help people appreciate the process, recognize that many considerations need to be simultaneously addressed, and be empowered to expect better homes. Then some sort of "magic" needs to occur to get the house to be THEIR perfect house. It should be their home and not just another box to keep out the rain. Who provides the magic touch? An architect.

So, no, I am not suggesting people do it themselves. I am suggesting that they can design better houses with the right process, thinking, and professional help. My book strongly advocates using an architect. I point out why it is worth it. This new book will only illustrate small houses designed by architects. If I achieve my goal, my readers will see that designing their small house with the help of an architect will give them the house that is perfect for them.

The diehard do-it-yourself house designers will never hire an architect no matter what we do. But I believe there are lots of people who don't want to do it themselves, but just don't realize what architects do and why it is worth paying their hard earned money to hire one of us on to make sure they get the house they hope for.

Incidentally, I have already gotten responses from a number of talented architects with attractive projects they would like to show in my book.

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William Hirsch AIA
ARCHITECT
William J Hirsch, Jr Inc
West End NC
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4.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-29-2012 07:56
If you don't already do it, I would request that you consider some sort of statement in the front, middle and end of your book:

Nothing will substitute for a real, licensed architect who has the following:
-- 5 to 8 years of major accredited University architectural education who has graduated with an architectural professional degree
-- 10 years +/- of apprenticeship working for other licensed architects who observe and correct your work on a daily basis
-- Taking a State Architectural multiple day exam (NCARB created) that very few pass the first time.
-- Applying for and being granted a State license to practice architecture in at least one state
-- Practicing architecture for decades, solving real-world problems in 3 dimensions (not just making "plans")
-- Detailing complex situations to keep out water and hold a home together in the face of harsh environmental forces like wind, rain, snow, ice and seismic movement
-- Taking 12 to 36 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) each year for life, to stay up to date with the latest technological and other architectural design considerations.

thank you. 

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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5.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 10:55
Hello Rand: You are so full of yourself it is incredible. You are an example of why we are here, in the public eye, as professionals in architecture. If you can, humble yourself a little more and be more understanding. Your doggedness sometimes is very upsetting. In any case do not attempt to speak for us.

I think I know your reaction to this message but I have said much too much already. I have not read Williams books but I see it immediately as an excellent effort to tell the public what they need about houses and architects. Hopefully more like that will help to repair our profession. However I believe things have changed for the better or worse. It will never be the same as before. All these qualifications and trainings you are talking about does not help most of us to keep a household or even pay back our school loans which are fundamentally why anyone would need to go to school or undergo any training what so ever. If you are sitting pretty thank your good fortune. But stop writing like we are all in that situation!!!!!!!!

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Kene Meniru Ph.D., Assoc. AIA
Adjunct Professor
Parkville MD
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6.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 11:25
Kene, I am struggling to survive, just as most of us are.  I advocate for licensed residential architects and the public that we serve.  My sole goals are for residential licensed architects to thrive, while improving the practice and quality of residential architecture, which, as I understand it, is also the mission of CRAN.  That's it.  Sorry if anything I have said might lead you or anyone else to think otherwise.  

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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7.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 12:58

Rand,

What a great response about the architect's credentials advantage! In a few words you disassembled any argument on the value of so called "certified home designers".

Thank you so much to articulate in such a simple manner, what the AIA has such a problem in describing and supporting in all their public awareness tools.

Your colleague and friend,

Sydney.

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Sydney Head AIA
Sydney V. Head Architect
Newport Beach CA
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8.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 20:38
Rand,
I read your comments diligently, but this one I am not sure about.

Your qualifications for hiring an architect would scare off most clients, not that the requirements are not important.

I am not necessarily a FLW fan but recall that this profession selected Mr. Wright as the architect of the century, or something like that.  With his supposedly breath-taking, yet deteriorating examples of his work, Ol' Frank himself could not pass a couple of your requirements.



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D. Cook AIA
Tipp City OH
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9.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-02-2012 18:46
Hi D.Cook.  Really?  Someone actually reads what we write here?  Thanks.  Glad to know that people do that.
Seriously, I appreciate it.  Sometimes I think the words just go into the wind.

Regarding your statement about the requirements, my response is: ????
Those are the things that I had to do.  I thought those were pretty routine these days. Is there something about those requirements that do not sound correct these days to you?  Really: that's what I went through. I assume that was basic, which was why I commented on them; believing that all licensed architects would remember going through those activities.

And yes sir; I used to design churches for one of Mr. Wright's main apprentices in Orlando.  I do understand that back in Wright's day, today's requirements for architectural licensure as we know them today did not exist.  I was told first hand from Wright's apprentice, that Mr. Wright was MADE an AIA member; that it was not something that he necessarily requested!  Pretty funny.  Thanks for your input.

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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10.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-29-2012 07:57

Hello:

I believe this is my first post to a forum.  I would suggest to Rand that he take a second look at what Bill has done with his first book and plans to do with his second book.  Bill's effort does much to promote the talent and expertise that good residential architects offer.  Sarah Susanka put residential architecture squarely on the map, and I see Bill's work continuing to help feed the information-seeking public's appetite.  I would not feel threatened by that.  Just as some people may go to seminars about estate planning and then go to a $29 do-it-yourself legal document source, there are some who will attempt to cut and paste a dream home from magazines and books with a $29 software pakage.  We won't stop that.  This is an opportunity to possibly get some exposure along side other qulaity projects. Whether or not Bills' style is your cup of tea, Bill's book is well developed and produced, and has broad appeal - I am sure it took years to complete. Kudos for developing an extremely effective marketing tool that promotes what we do.  Perhaps Bill would throw a poor starving residential architect a bone from inquiries from the new book.
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Michael Looney AIA
President
Montchanin Design Group Inc.
Wilmington DE
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11.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-29-2012 08:15
It's not me, personally, being threatened, Michael; it's our entire profession.  Architects are being systematically erased from our culture.  Take  look at HGTV sometime.  When's the last time you even heard the word "architect" mentioned?  Or even "licensed" anything?  Our culture appears to be eroding into a licenseless melting pot of pseudo "designers" making "plans" for "builders."  It seems counter-productive for another licensed architect to even suggest that people try to design something that the public would be better served by having a true, licensed architect doing for them. If Bill's book is something other than that, then Bill, I apologize.  I guess I have a hair-trigger on this subject. 

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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12.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 08:33
Rand,
I've read many of your posts and it's hard to not envision you as anything short of an absolutist when it comes to delivery of services. I could be wrong, but considering your criticisms of my alternative approaches of getting Architectural designs to the average person, it seems that you have some sort of expectation that ALL Americans MUST engage in the traditional delivery method of Architectural Services, meaning that each person should be REQUIRED to hire an Architect first, take that design to 2-4 builders to bid, and then have the house built. Average people don't do this for a reason. Most people simply don't have the resources to pay 5 figures for an instruction manual, pay rent or mortgage on one place to live while ALSO paying mortgage on a construction site for 6-8 months. We can't EXPECT people to do something they simply can't afford to do.

We as a profession must look into alternative ways of getting our services out there if we want to survive and perhaps I'm misunderstanding your posts and many criticisms of me, but you seem to have highly unrealistic expectations of the majority of Americans. You are not going to kill the spec house delivery model. People like buying a house that's ready to move into. That's 1.3 million out of the total 1.6 million houses built at the top of the boom. The remaining 320,000 houses are commissioned by homeowners and we're maybe designing 50,000 of those. If you choose to simply focus on homeowner commissioned houses, you're missing 80% of the housing industry (spec houses). Most of these homeowners are finding builders first and the house designs come from plan books. Now, we can generate more plan book designs and divorce ourselves from the one on one interaction between the homeowner and Architect, but we can also learn to team up with builders that provide this level of housing, so we can work as teammates and participate in that process. Without that interaction, people simply don't understand where the design comes from or why it's important. We can come up with the most amazing plan book designs, but we miss out on the opportunity of showing people why design is important. It's a process and right now, most just see an end result without participating in the process. This is why 90% of my work comes through builders. We aren't beating them, so why not join them?

It is already ingrained in the mindset of the average person to find a builder first, mostly because the traditional delivery method of our services is unaffordable and that's not just the design, it's paying mortgage on a construction site while paying on a place to live too. If we're only providing 50,000 houses out of 1.6 million at the top of the building boom, then just do the math. What do you expect? We're not making ourselves available. We're making ourselves extinct by not evolving. My suggestion to you and your proponents is to start getting more creative about how you get your services out there without making ridiculous claims that we're going to simply require people use us when we clearly don't have anywhere close to the numbers of boots on the ground to facilitate that requirement. We need to earn the respect of the public by finding a way to be available, not force them to respect and love us.

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Eric Rawlings AIA
Owner
Rawlings Design, Inc.
Decatur GA
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13.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 11-30-2012 10:34
Thanks again, Eric, for calling people names, attributing motivations to others, while claiming for yourself the exclusive title of the Divine's Gift to the Builders of Renovations, and once again, in long-winded fashion, broadcasting numbers that others have called into question.  I will no longer engage with you in these pointless arguments.   Dale Carnegie said that "no one ever won an argument," and with us, that couldn't be a truer sentiment.  I wish you well.  You go your way and I will go mine.

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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14.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-03-2012 08:52
I said Divine Gift eh? You know, I design just as many new houses. Could I perhaps be ordained with a title for that too? I really do appreciate your enthusiasm and concern for our profession and we share an ultimate end goal of wanting to see all houses being designed by professional Architects. The difference is our polar opposite approach to get there. You seem to think the rest of the world is the problem and we must change them, while there is nothing wrong with what we've been doing all along. I feel if things aren't going right for us, then maybe it's us. Maybe we need to change our approach. You know, evolve. One definition of insanity is to keep repeating the same behavior while expecting different results.

As far as the numbers go would a more Laconian response be better received? Those aren't my numbers, question the US Census Bureau. 

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Eric Rawlings AIA
Owner
Rawlings Design, Inc.
Decatur GA
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15.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-04-2012 09:15
Have to weigh in with Eric on this. Architects have never been the leader when it comes to housing and no amount of ranting and wishing will make will make us so. Even many of the old "period" houses that we admire today were designed by the builders using pattern books. The only way to have a major voice in the market is to team up with the builders and provide a service that both they and the public need and appreciate. I don't find it hard and I haven't had to compromise my standards of design or documentation. ------------------------------------------- Thad Broom AIA Architect Thad A. Broom AIA, P.C. Virginia Beach VA -------------------------------------------


16.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-05-2012 09:19
Perhaps another way to promote the benefits of architectural services to the public is for the AIA (or the Housing Knowledge Community) to have dialogue with the mass media providers, including HGTV and the producers of "designer" programs, with the goal of incorporating more architects, and fewer designers and builders, in television programs.


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Anthony Chinn AIA
President
AAC Architects, Ltd.
St. Charles IL
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17.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-06-2012 09:27
As a minimum, the HGTV shows should educate their audience as to what it really takes to design and document their projects in order to price out and get through the code review process let alone build the project.. It's a real disservice to the design profession to see the host pull out an artsy rendering of the project and everyone goes to work like that is all that is needed.
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Thad Broom AIA
Architect
Thad A. Broom AIA, P.C.
Virginia Beach VA
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18.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-07-2012 08:31
Yep.  You get it, Thad.  I share your frustrations.  Also, there appears to hardly ever be any licensed anyones involved in those shows.  It makes me wonder if there is some agenda there?  Hopefully not.
I might add that those shows are also a disservice to the public's Health, Safety & Welfare.  As if a major restaurant renovation would be allowed to happen start to finish in 48 hours!  And with no architects, engineers or legitimate contractors or building permits or inspections.  Or that a "designer person" could properly handle major structural revisions to aging homes of 4 stories, along with plumbing, electrical, flashing and waterproofing details (Details?  We don't need no stinking details!)  and completely renovate those within a week or so on a $10k budget.  They never mention that the show staff's labor is free, along with many other things that most clients would have to pay for.

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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19.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-10-2012 13:24
A ways down Thad says that architects have never played a major role in home design.  In a talk by Jerry Messman, AIA at our Lake Superior Design Retreat stated that his firm then located in Des Moines was responsible for the design of some 30 percent of the constructed residences in the US.   His firm turned out plans for the plan books and developers for every imaginable type of user.  Maybe the claim is exaggerated but I bet their influence has been significant if not noticed by the "design" profession.   

The success of the firm led to the principals starting a challenge to build one house in one day for $100 in africa.  They never quite achieved the goal, but the attempt led to an intriguing development they called Abode.  The efforts on the project waned with the plunge of the economy.  

Peter
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Peter Carlsen AIA
Carlsen & Frank Architects
Saint Paul MN
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20.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-11-2012 09:14
I wish I had the time to put together a plan book as that appears to be one sure way to penetrate the housing market. My  gripes with plan book homes are that all tend to look alike, usually use way too many different materials, especially on the front facades, and the documentation needs major overhaul to meet today's codes.
Btw, this thread was started by William Hirsch looking for material for his new book. I have attended one of his CE classes and I can attest that he is one of us. His designs are first rate, the detailing in his homes is fantastic and he firmly believes in a architect led design apprach. His last book put forth his philosophy in a manner that can be understood by the layman and I applaud hime for that.

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Thad Broom AIA
Architect
Thad A. Broom AIA, P.C.
Virginia Beach VA
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21.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-12-2012 12:25
All - You might find it interesting to know that for a time the AIA endorsed The Architects' Small House Service Bureau for modest homes. Complete working drawings could be ordered from the Small Homes of Architectural Distinction: A Book of Suggested Plans. The original 1929 plan compendium (which includes an endorsement by then Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover along with that of the AIA Board of Directors) was re-published in 1987 by Dover as Authentic Small Houses of the Twenties. I use it frequently as a reference.

I think the idea of the Housing KC reaching out to home improvement shows is excellent. Anyone interested in volunteering for such an initiative should contact me. 

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Kathleen Dorgan AIA
Principal/Chair
Dorgan Architecture & Planning
Storrs CT
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22.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-13-2012 08:58
Hi Kathleen,

Are you looking for someone to organize a new book of architect's designs to be sold as stock plans or are you looking for the architects and their designs so you can do it yourself?

Dave


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David Andreozzi AIA
Owner
Andreozzi Architects
Barrington RI
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23.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-14-2012 10:23
Folks, I don't know if any of you have actually had anyone contact you after seeing your work in a plan book.  I hope that works for you.  Unfortunately, what it appears to do, in my opinion, is to cheapen the perceived value of what architects do and turn it into a commodity, or worse: for free.  I can't tell you how many clients and potential clients have come to me with a page torn out of one of those books, saying: "I'd like something like this, but change this here and there."

I have to explain to them that such an act is illegal, that the creator of that design owns it; it is at the very least common law copyrighted.  And usually, we can then proceed to do what should be done, which is to program what they really want, then design something that is tailor-made for them.

Any of us that would consent to using another's work, even with a few changes is guilty of copyright infringement, which applies to derivative works as well.  Just check out: Section 102 of the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C.

 I believe that the Public has no understanding of this, and perceives that once they see something in a book that they have seen or bought, that THEY now own it and can use it. Such plan book floor plans and images end up in people's scrapbook, labled: "Ideas for our house."  Which they then take to their builder, drafter, or possibly an architect. The little cost of such books, I believe, gives people the erroneous assumption that ALL other architectural "plans" from any of us should cost about the same as what they have spent to acquire such materials.  Beware.  This is not a good thing, in my opinion.  Okay: now let the zombies among us rain down on me about how we should be working for minimum wage..

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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24.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-17-2012 13:41


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Perry Cofield AIA
Design Ways & Means Architects
Arlington VA
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SINCE WHEN ARE ARCHITECTS FAVORING THE SUPRESSION OF FREE SPEECH?  Rand, this is no way to win friends and influence people.  The writing of design guides with examples is a time-honored tradition in our field.  Ask Corbu, Chas Moore, Venturi, Duo Dickinson, and any number of other current writers.  I have had dinner with Mr. Hirsch at two Reinventions, he is a fine gentleman.  The AIA bookstore would not carry his first book, possibly because there was nothing "rad" being advocated.  But he sells the books he writes as part of his living.  He is an architect as much Steven Holl.  Loosen up, Randy baby! 







25.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-18-2012 08:43
Perry, my good friend.  Not trying to suppress anything.  Just reporting what happens, in real life. And nothing negative intended toward Mr. Hirsch.  I am still not a fan of "plans books."  I think they tend to undermine what we do.
 All my best,

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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26.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-19-2012 09:42
Ladies and gentlemen, please think bigger! Sure, many define architecture as providing a highly customized design to a highly unique client. However, wouldn't we all agree that sound design is also good for the masses? Should Michael Graves have not designed products for Target because it undermined what we do? On the contrary, it exposed a whole new crop of folks to good design to the point where now Target customers quickly lap up the designer product offerings at Target. I believe the same concept applies to plan books. We have all seen poor design in our communities. Why not provide the greater pubic with thoughtful design in a prototypical package? If it helps keep the lights on, why wouldn't that be a good idea for any small business owner? We shouldn't paint ourselves into a corner as a profession by implying that what we do is better than some people deserve/need/can afford.

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Gordon Rogers AIA
EAS Department Executive
Kitchell CEM, Inc.
Sacramento CA
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27.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-20-2012 07:16
Personally, I'm not very thrilled about the plan books. I have been providing builders with the alternative to have a unique, truly custom design for each lot they build on. More of us could be doing this if we learn to work with the builders. When you work with a builder as a teammate, you can bring your fees down and they bring you the work. If you can let go of micromanaging the process and let a spec builder source their own finishes, equipment, and accessories, they can provide a much better product than a plan book design for affordable cost while giving Architects more work. When one design is repeated over and over and over, those are jobs, jobs, jobs that we could of had. If we could learn that a spec house is a much different design problem than a millionaire homeowner house with only two contracts and parties involved rather than three, then we could be producing almost as much as 10x more houses than the number of commercial buildings being constructed. In 2006 1.6 million house were built and 1.3 million were spec houses. Only 170,000 commercial buildings were built. Think about it. As long as we insist on micromanaging every building to death in order to be more excellent, we will lose those 1.3 million potential jobs to the plan book.

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Eric Rawlings AIA
Owner
Rawlings Design, Inc.
Decatur GA
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28.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-27-2012 10:12
Just to address a side issue that has arisen in the course of this discussion -

With regard to the issue of copyright (thank you, Mr. Soellner, for providing the chapter and verse): if you read the document, it states that the copyright protection subsists in any tangible medium of expression (e.g. a printed or original drawing), however, it then goes on to state that "In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work."

As I understand it, this means that while the drawings are copyrighted, the ideas in them (i.e. the designs themselves) are not.
So, you cannot go around calling some other architect's drawing your own, however, you can design a building which is exactly like one that someone else has already designed.

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Kate Svoboda-Spanbock AIA, CID
Principal
HERE Design and Architecture
Los Angeles CA
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29.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-28-2012 08:23
Hello AIA General Counsel:
Please respond to Ms. Svoboda-Spanbock's comments.

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Rand Soellner AIA
Architect/Owner/Principal
Home Architects
Cashiers NC
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30.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 12-31-2012 08:01
Really? That's certianly an extremely creative yet equally inaccurate interpretation.

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Stephen Dunakoskie AIA
Principal
Stephen Dunakoskie, Consulting
Leesburg VA
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31.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 01-01-2013 13:44
Well, what is a design if not an idea? Why are all proponents of Classical architecture not therefore guilty of copying ionic columns? Surely it is not only that the ancient Greeks are all now dead?

Mr. Dunakoskie, can you please clarify?

A happy, healthy, productive and prosperous new year to us all -

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Kate Svoboda-Spanbock AIA, CID
Principal
HERE Design and Architecture
Los Angeles CA
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32.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 01-02-2013 08:41

Who are thier heirs or corporate entities which might object?  This plagiarism, rather copyright infringment action, is usually started as a civil court and not initially a State regulation (law) or AIA censure issue.

I believe the original statement was about "literal reproduction", thus causing the outcry - "foul".  The drawings are merely instruments of a service... ...etc..., right?

Antiquated non-authored, pre-regulated or broadly accepted theory, all require zero justification as a form of copyright infringement "risk management". As some historic background, sometime around 1990, clarification was provided through case law where Architect's Instruments were in fact Copyright Protected. Some added research would be necessary here to better answer such questioning more comprehensively. 

This means you cannot literally copy another (post-copyright regulated) architects' designs, certainly not dimensionally exact.  Well, if you get caught as this is residential.  And, we're looking at a specific "discussion point" about literal reproductions.  More important as pointed out earlier by Rand, you'd need to seek guidance from your own legal counsel to mitigate any undue exposure regarding such a desire to literally copy designed or built works. 

Finally, with adequate precedent research; yes of course, you can replicate virtually anything and also extricate abstracts from any concept.

I don't intend to make judgments about practice in any of these statements, merely my understanding of the principles. However, if one holds an extremely austere philosophy and ethical stance on plagiarism, you might even find Philip Johnson's relationship with Miesian concepts objectionable.  Although banal at worst, given the theory abstraction, the redesign(s) were never beyond the societal rule.


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Stephen Dunakoskie AIA
Principal
Stephen Dunakoskie, Consulting
Leesburg VA
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33.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 01-02-2013 23:28
In 1990 Congress officially passed the Architectural Works copyright Protection Act of 1990 (AWCPA) into law.  What constitutes an architectural work?
The statue defines it as the design of a building as by any tangible medium of expression, such as plans, buildings or sketches.
Attorneys encourage architects to even date and retain sketches in case you need to prove that the design is yours.

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D. Cook AIA
Tipp City OH
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34.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 01-01-2013 20:34
Re:  Copyright Laws
In 2009, the AIA published a series of 5 articles by Gregory Hancks, AIA, Associate General Counsel entitled "Copyright or Copy Wrong?" specifically how the Laws apply to architects' work - the architectural design itself along with drawings and specifications.

Suggest that architects review the series to understand just where they stand before they wake up in a federal law suite.

I would agree with Stephen Dunakoskie's statement, 


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D. Cook AIA
Tipp City OH
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35.  RE:Submissions for New Book

Posted 01-02-2013 11:07
Here are the links to those five articles. (They can also be found by Googling "Gregory Hancks, AIA, Associate General Counsel entitled "Copyright or Copy Wrong?") 


http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek08/0718/0718p_cpyrite.cfm

http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek08/0815/0815p_copyright.cfm

http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek09/0626/0626b_copyright.cfm

http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek09/0925/0925p_copyright.cfm

http://info.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek09/1016/1016p_copyright5.cfm

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Kathleen Simpson
Director, Knowledge Communities
The American Institute of Architects
Washington DC
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