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An architect-driven resource to identify key building energy modeling terms and concept, this wiki is an evolutionary process BEM’s rightful place in architectural design.

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BEM predicts a building’s anticipated energy use and corresponding energy savings, as compared to a standard baseline. In so doing, it demonstrates project compliance with local, regional or national energy codes. BEM predicts energy performance based on Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) data, as well as assumptions about building operation and maintenance.

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Building Operation Modeling introduces actual utility bills, use patterns, hours of operation, functioning of systems, and real weather conditions for a completed building into a model structured similarly to the Building Energy Model. It thereby allows the comparison of actual energy use with the predicted use. This comparison can be used to determine causes of discrepancies between predicted energy use and actual energy use, which in turn facilitates tuning of systems to better meet—or even exceed—the design goals. The process of comparison of the BEM and the BOM is known as “calibrated simulation” or Measurement & Verification (M&V). [Presently, there is little industry agreement on a method that accurately compares BEMs to BOMs, accounting for all the potential variations of building use and operations. ASHRAE Guideline 14 and the USDOE’s International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) provide the currently agreed methods for this type of work.] The Building Operation Model is also used to satisfy emerging building code requirements for post-occupancy monitoring.

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I'm 16 years old and all i want is to practice architecture in design of home. 
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eGrid is a multiplier that describes the mix of electrical generation types (e.g., coal, natural gas, nuclear, solar, hydro, etc.) that make up national and regional power grids. eGrid accounts for differences in regional electricity generation source capacities, which has implications on the amount of resulting carbon dioxide emissions. It thus provides data that enable architects to understand the real environmental impact of our building design’s energy consumption. Importantly, eGrid relates the energy lost due to inefficiencies inherent in generation and distribution systems to the on-site electrical consumption of a building, which accounts for only a portion of the electrical power generated to serve the building. Understanding the full impact of our building designs means understanding how the electricity is generated that serves the building as well as the associated emissions. eGrid is currently accepted as the way to convert site energy to source energy.

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Energy Use Intensity is a measurement that describes a building’s annual energy consumption relative to the building’s gross square footage. To date, this term is most often used as an expression of an existing building’s actual, metered energy consumption, or as a comparative average, which is derived from a data set of metered information for a particular building use type in a specific location. Both of these uses of EUI are based on real, measured building energy use data.

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Energy Use Intensity Proposed (EUIp) describes the energy use for a project based on modeled source energy. Being source-based, rather than site-based, it includes energy generation and transmission losses and is therefore a better prediction of the total energy footprint of your project than pEUI. EUIp equals the source kBtu per year divided by the project’s square footage.

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Predicted Energy Use Intensity (pEUI) describes the energy use for a project based on modeled site energy. pEUI is a modeled number and, because of the distinctions described earlier between Building Energy Modeling and Building Operation Modeling, very likely will not match actual building operations. pEUI equals the site kBtu per year divided by the project’s square footage.

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Project Resource Modeling is the most extensive and broad of the four most common forms of modeling. It assesses multiple resource issues that affect and are affected by the development of a project, including energy, water, material selection, and solid waste. It may also include transportation, primary growth issues, manufacturing, social and agricultural elements, embodied energy, carbon emissions, health, and other factors. This type of extensive study typically addresses the interrelationships among resources, their consumption, efficiencies, and conservation. PRM can assess existing site resources, as well as components that may be brought to the site. It is important to note, in the context of this guide, that energy is only one of the resources considered in this broader resource modeling process.

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Site energy is the measure generally familiar to the design profession. It is the amount of energy consumed by a building and is reflected in utility bills paid by the building owner.

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Source energy is a more accurate measure of a building’s energy footprint, because it includes energy that is lost during production, transmission, and delivery to the building. Electricity is the prime example; what is consumed at the building is only a proportion of the fuel energy fed into the power plant.

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Zero Energy Performance Index (zEPI) is a value that represents the ratio of energy performance of a proposed building design compared to the average energy performance of buildings with similar occupancy and climate types, benchmarked to the year 2000. It is the ratio of a proposed building’s EUIp to the EUI of a baseline or reference building model, multiplied by 100 to give a scalar value, which can range from zero (for a zero energy building) to 100 (for a building that uses the same amount of energy as the baseline model).

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