Small Project Practitioners

Small Project Practitioners sorted by thread
 
  AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 03, 2013 1:30 PMMs. Mary Brush, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 05, 2013 2:34 PMMark Robin, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 08, 2013 10:07 PMDavid Johnson, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 09, 2013 5:45 PMJoel Niemi, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 10, 2013 10:25 PMDonald Wardlaw, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 11, 2013 10:56 AMD. Cook, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 11, 2013 11:30 AMChristopher Walsh, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 12, 2013 6:23 PMGregory Holah
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 15, 2013 9:13 PMJoel Niemi, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 16, 2013 12:00 PMRichard Shugar, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 17, 2013 6:16 PMWalter Hainsfurther, FAIA
  AIA PacsApr 18, 2013 5:39 PMJoseph Hagan, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 18, 2013 6:21 PMRobin Miller, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 19, 2013 7:06 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 22, 2013 6:39 PMLisa Selligman, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 23, 2013 6:50 PMRobin Miller, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 24, 2013 5:46 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 26, 2013 1:35 PMRobin Miller, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 29, 2013 7:14 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 30, 2013 8:39 PMEric Rawlings, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 02, 2013 12:28 PMMichele d'Amico, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 03, 2013 8:08 PMGregory Holah
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 06, 2013 6:16 PMMr. Lee Calisti, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 15, 2013 10:27 PMMark Robin, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 09, 2013 6:00 PMWalter Hainsfurther, FAIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningApr 10, 2013 5:51 PMMichael Strogoff, FAIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 02, 2013 12:22 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 03, 2013 7:14 PMMr. W. Gilpin Jr., FAIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 06, 2013 2:56 PMMichael Malinowski, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 07, 2013 6:23 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 08, 2013 2:51 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 08, 2013 6:01 PMMr. Stuart Chait Sr., AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 08, 2013 6:03 PMWalter Hainsfurther, FAIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 08, 2013 10:30 PMMichael Malinowski, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 09, 2013 9:13 AMRobin Miller, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 10, 2013 5:52 PMAdam Trott, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 10, 2013 6:18 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 14, 2013 12:18 AMChristiaan Semmelink, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 10, 2013 6:14 PMSean Catherall, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 10, 2013 11:37 PMEric Rawlings, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 10, 2013 6:22 PMEric Rawlings, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 11, 2013 12:35 PMChristopher Carley, AIA
  RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioningMay 13, 2013 9:46 PMEric Rawlings, AIA
 

1.
AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Ms. Mary Brush, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 03, 2013 1:30 PM
Subject: AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
This message has been cross posted to the following Discussion Forums: Historic Resources Committee and Small Project Practitioners .
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This is a fascinating discussion on the value of AIA Membership for the dues, the communication of the organization within membership, and how the organization can improve.  The writers are long term members of the AIA with varying levels of involvement in the organization.  Thank you!  the current repositioning efforts underway by AIA National are having similar cathartic effects on what the organization should be in the future.  
the attached youtube link is from the Grassroots presentation on the repositioning effort

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x22D0po1h5Y&feature=player_embedded

Hopefully this will keep the conversation going.

 

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Mary Brush AIA
Brush Architects, LLC
AIA Illinois Past President
Chicago IL
soon to be WBE!!!
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2.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Mark Robin, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 05, 2013 2:34 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

Once again the AIA is evolving to sustain us in the future.  In our history has any other such efforts improve the profession.  If so, why would such mannerism be employed

From my perspective as a small project practitioner, the only way to elevate our lot is to make our services a requirement.  The services of other professions like medicine, accounting, lawyering are used through need, not value.   Firms need accounts to figure taxes, partnership filing, etc.  To obtain eye glasses one first must see an ophthalmologist.  What I am saying is the the total legislative efforts of the AIA should be to pass the necessary legislation so than no construction in this country can be permitted without the services of an Architect.

The level of services that should be required should provide an sustainable life for architects.  Morover the benefits to society and the better built environment with make our value obvious.  As things are now the Institute will continue struggling trying to sell value while "need" is what can sustain us.
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Mark Robin AIA
Mark Robin Architecture
Nashville TN
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3.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: David Johnson, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 08, 2013 10:07 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

When I first joined the AIA in the early 1990's I was eager to be part of an organization that worked to promote Architects, first and foremost. I have, for the most part, been disappointed in this regard. For a long time, each time I paid the dues I was telling myself it was happening, but now, many years later, it hasn't happened.

The Architect and Architecture is struggling to survive. There is some great work being done, however there is far too much bad or no-design being promoted. Architects are quitting the profession and going to nearly anything else because their contribution to society is not valued as it should be. It should be the main focus of the AIA to promote this value head on.

While the AIA has promoted many issues that are noble, it has consistently gotten sidetracked on social issues and lost in the weeds of others that stem from personal political preferences - drifting wherever the current social trends take them. Those issues should be left to other organizations and architects left to join them separately as they choose. At best, the AIA has nibbled at the edges of promoting who we are as architects and how our service is essential to society.

And so, I can't shout loud enough my agreement with Mark Robin's comment: "the total legislative efforts of the AIA should be to pass the necessary legislation so than no construction in this country can be permitted without the services of an Architect."

This is long overdue to us as architects and to anyone who has any connection to the built environment. There needs to be a real change not just catharsis. AIA Leadership everywhere you are, I'm still paying dues are you listening?

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David Johnson AIA
Portland OR
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4.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Joel Niemi, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 09, 2013 5:45 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Mark wrote "the total legislative efforts of the AIA should be to pass the necessary legislation so than no construction in this country can be permitted without the services of an Architect."

I disagree.
First of all, it's a state-by-state thing on registration and the role of architects.
Next, "you can't build unless you give me a slice of the pie" sounds frankly like extortion.

I think that the AIA needs to make the case for the value that an architect brings to the project.  IF part of that value is "you need me to meet minimum levels of safety and to get a building permit", THAT IS FINE, but "hire me or don't build" is not the most customer-friendly approach.  The message that's not getting out very well is "spend a bit of time (and money) with an architect and you'll get something really special and probably save what you spent in fees."

Some construction types are probably always going to be exempt from requiring an architect.  Plan-book houses, subject to dealing with local seismic, snow, and energy code issues - frankly, for that market, the buyer gets what they pay for.  Later, when it comes time to remodel, might or might not require an architect.

I'd say that promoting competent plan review, ensuring that standards are upheld requiring architects to be involved in larger commercial structures, and the like, are the lines in the sand to draw.

Finally, the AIA has a real place as a watchdog over liability issues, public policy regarding architectural practice, and taxation.  We're seen as consultants to the rich and to big companies, and it's assumed we line our pockets accordingly, and that those pockets are deep.  Not so, as most of us know.

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Joel Niemi AIA
Principal
Snohomish WA

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5.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Donald Wardlaw, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 10, 2013 10:25 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

First, greetings to Mark Robin, glad to hear you are still out and about.

With respect to legislating that buildings, including residential buildings be designed by architects, there are downsides to that and I don't support the idea.

When I see a problem, my reaction is never, "Let's pass a law, set up a board, establish a testing regimen to fix this!"  5 states already have license requirements for someone who shampoos someone else's hair.  7 states requires licenses for someone who does upholstery repair.  Of 102 licensed occupations studied in a report from The Institute for Justice, only 15 were licensed in 40 states or more which means that either there is a lot of harm being done that could be prevented, or a lot of licensing is happening that is not vital---except that it is a source of state revenue and serves to protect the occupational opportunities of select classes of folks.  Usually the excluded ones are from low income backgrounds.

Now maybe one could contend that as architects we have more opportunity to do good or harm.  So, are we asking for homeowners to be required to hire licensed architects because of the havoc created by unlicensed designers and do-it-yourselfers, or because we'd like a special privilege, which has nothing to do with protecting society?

Or do we think that a license guarantees the best service?  In my state all plumbers are required a licensed by the state.  Are all those plumbers good plumbers?  Top notch plumbers?  Union plumbers are believed to have more rigorous training.  They ought to be somewhat better for that, especially in the early years of their career.  Should we require that all plumbing be done by union plumbers?

My state does also recognize that some structures require elevated skill, technical skill mainly.  So, hospitals, schools, police stations and the like, must be engineered by licensed Structural Engineers.  That is a higher standard than the more common Civil Engineer.  Yet it is the Civil Engineers who manage the "structural" engineering of all other structures, that is most structures.  If Structural Engineers are more capable, shouldn't all Civil Engineers be required to work under a Structural Engineer?  

Some theoretical advantages are not vital, even before the offsetting disadvantages are considered.

There is also the issue of restraint of trade.  If requiring all buildings be architect designed, in effect prices low cost designers out of the market, and AIA furthers this legislative effort, would AIA be open to the charge that it is engineering a floor under architectural fees?  AIA got its wrist slapped pretty hard by the DOJ for attempting to keep fees above a certain level once before.

Leaders are not victims in need of protection.  And how can we be so valuable to society if we clearly are working the system for our own benefit at the expense of others?  We will benefit if our work is seen as beneficial and cost effective.  The AIA can help with the messaging, but in the end each of us has to make the case if it can be made.  I think for most architects, it can be made.  Convincingly, but not in every instance.

Take care,

Donald

 

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Donald Wardlaw AIA
More Than Construction, Inc.
Oakland CA
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6.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: D. Cook, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 11, 2013 10:56 AM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I agree with most everything Joel Niemi says- No construction without the services of an architect is a state-by-state thing.  The AIA at all levels combined is not ready to take on the Home Builders' Assoc. and the Realtors.  We do not have enough guns!  As big and expensive as anyone may think, the AIA is, we do NOT have a big enough dog for that fight.
Promoting competent plan review and building inspections is a valid point.  Both of these are spotty, at best, in the Midwest.  Energy compliance for 1 and 2-Family Dwellings is a joke.
I find that codes are getting more complicated and many reviewers and inspectors are not up-to-date nor do not have a clue.  I see the time when a third party certifier will have to be hired to certify most all tasks.  Put the responsibility off on some one else.
 

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D. Cook AIA
Tipp City OH
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7.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Christopher Walsh, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 11, 2013 11:30 AM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

I agree with Mark Robin that the AIA (and every licensed Architect) should push for ALL buildings to require an Architect's stamp, please read my thoughts. 

I primarily work in and around Chicago where most every municipality requires stamped drawings and it is not seen as "extortion".  These municipalities understand that a licensed professional who has been properly trained to review codes and structure is guaranteeing the building is safe and compliant to local codes.  In addition they have insurance in case something ever happens.  The City of Chicago now requires the Architect's certificate of insurance which I think is fantastic, I now bring my insurance certificate when I submit for permits in the suburbs and encourage them to make this a requirement (we should all do this).  I believe the AIA should work with the insurance companies and make them aware that many areas in this country have homes or buildings that were designed and built by people without an Architect's license and may not be insured.  I would ultimately hope they may increase premiums on buildings where this is the case, or decrease where an Architect stamp is in place.  I believe they could be our greatest ally to encourage all municipalities to require both an Architect's stamp and insurance.  It seems the profession has spent the last 30-40 years trying to shed the responsibility of stamping drawings so they don't get sued, I encourage the opposite.  
 
Please notice I have never mentioned "design", I work with many Designers who are extremely talented and I have great respect for them.  I do not believe that just because someone has passed the Architect's exam that they are good designers.  With this being said trying to sell Architect services on the "better design because I'm an Architect" principal alone is a tough sell especially when many Designers have proven they are better.  However, I do believe that Designers should work in conjunction with Architects for the reasons stated above.  I guarantee if we made this happen the occupation of Architects would be elevated.


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Christopher Walsh AIA
Tandem Architecture
Chicago, IL
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8.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Gregory Holah
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 12, 2013 6:23 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I agree with Christopher and others that requiring an Architect's approval on construction projects is in no way extortion, and I argue is ludicrous.  The requirement can be made based on a valuation or sq. footage so that a certain scale of projects are exempt.  I would like to point to the other disciplines that are typically involved in projects and require approval from the engineer.  Why should we be any different?

In my state if I want to drive a car, I must carry the minimum insurance requirements, with proof of coverage.  One could refer to this as "extortion" I suppose, but the law is obviously in place to protect the general public with a minimum standard of protection, in the event of an accident.

Building failures occur for a variety of reasons, why would we not enforce and regulate the renovation and construction of structures with the same minimum standard for those directly involved?

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Gregory Holah AIA
Principal
Holah Design + Architecture LLC
Portland OR
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9.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Joel Niemi, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 15, 2013 9:13 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Gregory,
I think that the starting point which Oregon places on projects (many small projects are exempt) to determine the need for an architect are quite reasonable.  And, a critical part of the Oregon statute is the requirement that the architect be involved during construction administration.
I do find in interesting that Oregon requires an architect, if involved in an "exempt" project, must still stamp and sign the documents.  Too bad it is not required that the non-architect projects don't include a statement like "this drawing was not prepared by an architect or under an architect's oversight".

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Joel Niemi AIA
Principal
Snohomish WA  (registered in Washington and Oregon

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10.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Richard Shugar, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 16, 2013 12:00 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I'm with Greg.

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Richard Shugar AIA
Principal
2fORM Architecture PC
Eugene OR
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11.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Walter Hainsfurther, FAIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 17, 2013 6:16 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

Richard,, Greg, et al:

I have no problem with your ideas, but you appear to be looking for "AIA" to wave a wand and make it happen.  First, states control the licensing issue.  Have you spoken to your state legislative staffer about these ideas? 

We recently had our annual state lobby day.  A near record attendance of about 90 architects and interns showed up.    Think of that number for a minute.  90 architects and interns out of over 3,000 AIA members.  Not a very good showing. 

Do you have a relationship with your legislator(s)?  Will they listen to you and give you honest (not political) answers to your ideas?  Does your state organization know about that relationship and use it to benefit the profession? 

Then take a look at your state's PAC and the number of contributors and the amount in that PAC.  A PAC allows the organization to make contributions to candidates.  Dues don't go for that effort, and without financial support, it is very difficult getting your voice heard.  Especially when you are competing with all those home builders and non-licensed folks.

As I have said before here, three things influence legislators: Numbers (not enough architects compared to other consituants), Money (see above) and Credibility (something we usually have on our side.) 

My point is that the AIA is "us."  If it is failing, then we, as a profession and as practicioners, need to look in the mirror.  You want things to change?  Then step up and make a difference. 
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Walter Hainsfurther FAIA
Kurtz Associates Architects
Des Plaines IL
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12.
AIA Pacs
From: Joseph Hagan, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 18, 2013 5:39 PM
Subject: AIA Pacs
Message:
Well said Walter!

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Joseph Hagan AIA
Past State President
Architecture Inc.
Memphis TN
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13.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Robin Miller, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 18, 2013 6:21 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:

Minor point, but I see the words, we "stamp drawings" or architects are required to "stamp drawings"  in some of these threads and I cringe.  In South Dakota it is illegal to stamp drawings . . . it's called plan stamping.  So we teach every one of or employees to clearly tell others (when the subject comes up) that we do not stamp drawings.  We do "seal our work", however.  See the difference?  If not, keep reading.

We have registered architects in this state that stamp designs and/or drawings that have created by others .  Some architects do partial services, leave off CA phase services (which are required in SD), etc.  Unfortunately, they get away with it.  Like several have implied, we are only as good as those who regulate our profession and enforce the regulations; and we (architects) are the ones ultimately responsible for much of the mess the profession is in.  Until we are unified behind bringing our profession up by our own bootstraps, I'm afraid not much will change.  The day I see an end to plan stamping, partial services, undercutting and providing inferior services, etc. is the day we'll see the kind of changes that are needed.
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Robin Miller AIA
MSH Architects
Sioux Falls SD

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14.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Sean Catherall, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 19, 2013 7:06 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Robin,

I disagree partially with your assessment. Rather than getting into hair-splitting over the terms "stamp" and "seal", I'd like to focus on partial services. Many of the potential clients I have contacted over the past several years have been reluctant to hire me because they don't understand the value of my services. Regardless of really excellent persuasion on my part (I'm modest and humble, too), most of them have a Wal-Mart mentality and are more eager to save up-front dollars than to receive the best value available in exchange. As a result, low-ball contractors are able to get the projects I don't get. The only way to reach that sector of the market is to lower the price of the services by reducing the scope of services. It is neither illegal nor unethical to provide reduced services and such services does not constitute "plan-stamping".

When the law tells these clients that their project must be designed by a licensed architect and when the state professional practice act requires architects to performing a full range of services on every project, they will see the value of our work quite differently.

This is no different than the requirement that a structural engineer design structures in high seismic zones (everyone here accepts taht). There are even areas in my county (airport zones) where an architect is required to perform acoustic calculations to verify that plane noise will not be harmful to residents. However, the same structures that require architectural acoustic calcs and structural calcs do not have general requirements for architectural design. Therefore, a huge pool of potential clients will never find it important to hire an architect.

Where I agree with you is this: We (collectively) have allowed low-ball contractors to exploit the Wal-Mart mentality unopposed. Unfortunately the AIA (the organization we pay to represent the "collective we") has been asleep at the wheel on this issue.

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Sean Catherall AIA
Herriman UT
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15.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Lisa Selligman, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 22, 2013 6:39 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I haven't figured out how to solve the Wal-Mart mentality either, but I'm not sure that legislation requiring using architects has helped with fees. Conversely, a study I did a few years back regarding the relationship between practice acts and prestige suggested that requiring services tended to result in potential clients on the bottom end viewing hiring a "required" professional as a necessary evil - part of the bureaucratic problem rather than the solution. What is the solution? I don't know. I try to prove my value to every client, every day, and I write a lot of limited service contracts that often gradually expand to full services as the bare-bones clients discover I bring a lot of experience and knowledge to the table. 

And the AIA in previous decades had more to do with fees .... can't anymore. See http://www.nytimes.com/1990/07/06/us/justice-department-files-antitrust-suit-against-architects.html

--lisa

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Lisa Selligman AIA
Red Dot Studio, Inc.
Saint Louis MO
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Where I agree with you is this: We (collectively) have allowed low-ball contractors to exploit the Wal-Mart mentality unopposed. Unfortunately the AIA (the organization we pay to represent the "collective we") has been asleep at the wheel on this issue.

--



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16.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Robin Miller, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 23, 2013 6:50 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Good discussion points, Sean.

A couple of quick thoughts: My point was to pick up on the thread that architects are frequently our own greatest enemies.  It's not just contractors and owners.  We, as a group, assist them.  Plan stamping is a reality.  I have seen and experienced architects do all of the following, none of which helps the profession:  Stamp plans prepared by others, provide partial services and/or no CA (which is illegal in this state),  lowball fees,  undercut other's fees, steal projects from other architects who already have signed contracts by going back to the client and adjusting their fees or services.  Under the surface, it's ugly out here.

It may not be illegal and you have every right to go after it, but when you say, "the only way to reach that sector of the market is to lower the price of the services by reducing the scope of the services." I am afraid we are feeding fuel on the fire.  And then we blame contractors and owners.  Makes no sense to me.

How about we all refuse to lower our standards, services and prices?  It's up to us.  If I don't knuckle under and then you don't knuckle under, we stand a fighting chance of one of us getting the project for a reasonable fee for quality work.  I for one, refuse to reduce my services and scope to a point where I do a disservice to my clients or the public.  And I will seal only that which I am proud to put my name to.

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Robin Miller AIA
MSH Architects
Sioux Falls SD
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17.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Sean Catherall, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 24, 2013 5:46 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I would be very willing to join the effort to not reduce services and prices--if I had an adequate amount of work to do. Since I have next to no work now, I would expect the result to be zero work in the future. "Not knuckling under" means my potential clients go forward with their projects without any architect at all. This is one of the reasons why a large percentage of us are still unemployed or underemployed and why the profession is not expanding and reaching new markets. Our business model only worked in the old economy, which ended four years ago for most of us.

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Sean Catherall AIA
Herriman UT
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18.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Robin Miller, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 26, 2013 1:35 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Thanks Sean.  What you say makes sense.  Those of us that are still around are still struggling.  I guess what I'm saying is that if you ever are competing against this firm, we won't be providing partial, reduced or otherwise inferior services for the sake of gaining a strategic price advantage over you.  Heck, we don't want to go out being known as the ones who dragged the profession even lower.

I hope I understand your need for work.  Not sure this will work, but how about one complete and well done project, compensated accordingly vs. three "reduced services" (with dramatically higher liability and potentially legal risks) and lower fee (with little to no opportunity to turn a profit) projects?  If we all subscribed to this, the bleeding would stop immediatly, would it not? I don't believe there are enough of us left to provide the kind of services that we should be providing for the projects that are out there.  
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Robin Miller AIA
MSH Architects
Sioux Falls SD
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19.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Sean Catherall, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 29, 2013 7:14 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Robin,

The defining characteristic of the clients I'm trying to reach (middle-income homeowners who have never used an architect before) is that I'm not competing against other architects--I'm competing against the absence of an architect. They're not looking at two or more architects and weighing which one provides the best service or does the most zoomy designs or provides the best overall value or works for the cheapest price. They're looking at me versus no architect at all and trying to decide which will be best for them. 80% of them decide not to use an architect at all (and I realize that's a hit rate of 20%, which is good in the industry), mostly because of 1) cost and 2) their fear that the architect will take control of the project (cost, scope, aesthetics, etc.) away from them to pursue their own crusade. (This is what they tell me.) I realize that there are other markets to reach. Those markets are already saturated with architects. And by trying to reach large, underserved markets, I'm trying to expand the profession for all of us.

In this market, I would gladly pursue fewer full-service, full-fee, reduced liability, reduced risk projects, but there are none of those to be had. So it is not a choice between 1 good and 3 bad. It is a choice between 3 bad projects and no projects at all. Not pursuing those does not stop the profession's bleeding--20% of us are unemployed and by my estimation another 50% are underemployed. Keeping our hands off new, difficult, risky markets will not solve that problem. Someone needs to blaze new trails, take new risks and handle new difficulties or the profession will become irrelevant.

If there aren't enough architects to satisfy current needs, why are so many firms going out of business, getting acquired by other firms, keeping salaries low and avoiding hiring?

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Sean Catherall AIA
Herriman UT
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20.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Eric Rawlings, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: Apr 30, 2013 8:39 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Sean,
You and I have been on the same page when it comes to finding work. I have found that there is a HUGE need for Architects in the middle to upper middle income earner range and we are our own worst enemy when it comes to connecting with these clients. I rarely compete with other Architects or designers for that matter. I have established a reputation for taking on even the most undesirably small job for over a decade and I tend to make better money per hour the smaller the project. As you and I have mentioned before, you don't have to reduce your worth to reduce your fee to an amount most can afford. Some people just need a good idea and a permit, but can't afford to pay for every service ever invent. Reduce your services to reduce your fee. Is it unprofessional to provide just the drawings needed by the code official? Is it your ideas, concepts, and solutions that make you excellent or is it the documentation?

I feel we tend to limit ourselves to a small pool of clientele in an effort to be excellent, so we shun the majority of the housing sector. A design problem is a design problem regardless of scale or cost. Good for any of you who are swimming in too many millionaire house projects, but is it so wrong to figure out a way to include everyone rather than be exclusive? And we wonder why HGTV, home shows, and average people always think of the builder first. I'm proud to offer my services to anyone, regardless of how small the design problem. Right now I'm working on a 14' x 20' concrete patio project for a guy in his late 70s who just needs a permit, but can't find someone to provide a few simple concrete details. I'm also working on a high density single family development with 15 houses. One fee is in terms of hundreds of dollars, the other is in the thousands. I'll make more money per hour on the concrete job, but the development will gain more attention.

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Eric Rawlings AIA
Owner
Rawlings Design, Inc.
Decatur GA
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21.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Michele d'Amico, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: May 02, 2013 12:28 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
I have built my practice on providing services to middle income and in some cases the lower income range earner.  In some cases the fees are small to nothing.  I have even accepted jobs that no one would take on to help the clients complete their permit processing because they got stuck by either a draftsman they hired or they did the drawings themselves.  What I have found by just providing services and gaining a reputation to help clients no matter how small the job that they have recommended me to their friends.  I look at what architects offer as a service to help people get through the building process whether it be consulting to provide guidance or just drawing up a patio with a roof to designing a custom home.  If as a profession we avoid looking at what we do as a service to everyone we are looked at as profession only people with money can afford.    There are more clients requiring minimal services than clients looking to build custom homes.  In the process of helping the small client it leads to larger projects.
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Michele d'Amico AIA
Owner
d'Amico Design Group, LLC
Honolulu HI
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22.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Gregory Holah
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: May 03, 2013 8:08 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
Message:
Well said Michele. 

I would also like to add a few comments in regards to the mention of the lowly "deck" project used as an example in earlier posts.  Small projects are not always the most exciting or glamorous project.  They may not be the projects we dream about nor the ones that make it into the monograph.  However, once the client wants to fabricate the deck out of glass and cantilever it 18 stories in the air, it gets a lot more attention from us.  From my experience, any project however small, done well will repay you in multiple ways, either through a future referral or a repeat client.  So I would just ask that to those that cannot swallow their pride and take on a small, gritty project, please don't turn away a potential client from hiring an Architect.  Instead, respectfully decline and refer an Architect colleague who would be happy to increase their workload.

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Gregory Holah
Principal
Holah Design + Architecture LLC
Portland OR
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23.
RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning
From: Mr. Lee Calisti, AIA
To: Small Project Practitioners
Posted: May 06, 2013 6:16 PM
Subject: RE:AIA Dues, Value of membership, and RePositioning