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What is sustainable design?

As the World Commission on Environmental and Development defines sustainability, it is designing that “[meets] the needs of today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” By utilizing various techniques that reduce not only environmental and economic impacts, but also improve efficiency of the building, sustainable architecture is planning for the future. Creating sustainable schools positively affects the children, their health, and their education process in many ways; the following are some of many:


1. Improved learning and well-being

Extremely simple yet fundamental techniques such as ample daylight and successful ventilation can have direct, quick, positive effects on student performance. Collaborative for High Performance Schools did a study in 2003 that revealed that “better indoor air quality in schools results in healthier students and faculty, which in turn results in lower absenteeism and further improves student achievement… the effect of daylighting in schools [also revealed] that students perform better in daylit classrooms, as well as [indicated] the health benefits of daylighting.” For instance, the structures course for the Architecture department at California State Polytechnic University of Pomona was recently moved from a small, cold, dark room with no windows to a spacious hall with ample light and ventilation flowing through the space; the effects were obvious: the students were happier, the test results were improved, and the general attitude was far more positive. Sustainable architecture accounts for these fundamental techniques and therefore, brings about improved learning and well-being.

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Member Slideshows are created each year for the Spring Conference to illustrate the recent work of the attendee’s firms. All COD members are welcome to participate. Attendees have 6 slides and 60 seconds to present their projects, or whatever is on their mind. Many of the 2012 Member Slideshow slides are posted on the COD Pinterest page.

Eskew + Dumez + Ripple has been selected as the 2014 AIA Architecture Firm Award recipient by the American Institute of Architects Board of Directors.




The Rosa F. Keller Library & Community Center, New Orleans, LA.


The Rosa F. Keller Library & Community Center, New Orleans, LA.

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I have videos and brochures of my experiences in the architecture field, which I wish to share, but as being an architect, I use graphics, some body can tell me how put that videos and brochures in the blogs?.
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I guess I am the new boy in the AIA HKC, to start I want to tell a little about myself.

I love the fluid stone: concrete for that I first practice by building using my idea of masonry concrete which becomes massive construction with 7,500 homes, eight schools and a shopping center in 15 months in Mexico City, 360 dwellings in one month in other location in Mexico City.  Note than Mexico City has earthquakes frequent, no damaged reported in such buildings, which were for people of lower income.  In Cancun, one 3 stories hotel and 10 houses, there: hurricanes, no damaged since around 40 years ago, for my masonry concrete practice.

Presently In the US I am a registered architect in California C 12555, expiration date 05/31/15.   I did work for several architectural firms, until working by myself, after several work using wood framing, I always talk about the thousand of dwellings I built in Mexico using concrete, they said: no never will have a Building Permit using concrete. 

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Member Slideshows are created each year for the Spring Conference to illustrate the recent work of the attendee’s firms. All COD members are welcome to participate. Attendees have 6 slides and 60 seconds to present their projects, or whatever is on their mind. Many of the 2012 Member Slideshow slides are posted on the COD Pinterest page.

Dirk Denison presented his slides.



Carmel Residence. Carmel, CA. Photo credit: David Matheson Photography.


Chicago Residence, Chicago, IL. Photo credit: Michelle Litvin Photography.

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Activities : Conferences  Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Retail & Entertainment Committee


 

This BIM

... might you know ... might you not ... might be a BIM

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Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Small Project Practitioners

I've been out of touch working on a new book that I hope will be complete by the end of this year. I'm including the first two paragraphs of the Introduction. They represent a synopsis that I've been seeking for a long time. I’m blogging them to stay in touch during this effort.

 

A growing population cannot survive without shelter on a planet with limited resources. The threat is shelter sprawl that consumes our source of life and shelter intensity that destroys our quality of life. The question is how to shelter these populations and protect their quality of life within a limited Built Domain that does not threaten their source of life -- the Natural Domain.

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My name is Nageen Ettefagh, but most people know me as Negeen Irani. As a 5th year architecture student at California Polytechnic State University Pomona, I have had the opportunity to be involved with my architectural education throughout my academic career. Being elected as the AIAS Chapter President is one among several of these opportunities. Aside from holding the title as the largest and most active chapters in the nation, CPP AIAS was also nominated for the National Chapter Honor Award for the 2013-2014 year. I also worked for Aedis Architects, a firm specializing in educational facilities, during the summer quarter to receive more professional experience. Currently, I am an avid social media director for the Neutra VDL Research House as well as Domaen. Overall, I have been privileged with an abundance of scholastic and social opportunities through my enrollment as an architecture student at the California Polytechnic University. With this, I hope to expand my knowledge on architecture for education. I am tremendously appreciative of this opportunity and I would like to once again express my appreciation for this honor. I cannot wait to meet each of you at the CAE Conference!

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Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Committee on Architecture for Education

From working on a few design proposals, I’ve begun to spot core differences in our approach when considering the various audience and users. In the conference rooms, our designers brainstorm with global mindsets and consider factors for the building environment that are very specific to an age group. In particular, designing for the kindergarten audience presents a separate set of challenges. As Kindergarten is such a crucial time period for students to develop cognitive, social, self-help, and literary skills, the criteria of considering the space is a trial in itself. Designers need to fulfill present-day parents’ needs while complying with contemporary architecture trends. In addition to adding value, designers have to also create a healthy environment that promotes diverse activities and establishes a solid foundation for their personal development. Below are the points that were debated most frequently in our firm when designing for Kindergarten spaces:

Addressing and Foreseeing Needs

We respond to local conditions, envisioning how children and teachers will be using the space. When we reach out to the community, we engage in discussions that explore on daily interactions, existing design preferences, desired learning outcomes, and future common goals for the space. With the changing terrain of the academic curriculum, we need to accommodate more diverse activities such as yoga, meditation, and pet care. To instill that amount of flexibility, we came up with a few creative ideas, ranging from tame to wild varieties, and run it by the focus groups, shareholders, and users to understand their level of engagement with the design.

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Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Committee on Architecture for Education

As an employer, you might think that implementing a safety program is costly; but, you would be surprised as to how low cost it is, to actually implement safe practices in the workplace. In addition to meeting OSHA compliance requirements, there are several reasons to implement a workplace safety program, on any construction site. In addition to laying out the safe work method statements for employees on the site, you can reduce various out of pocket expenses, by implementing these plans, plus you can keep employees safe.

Fewer injuries & possibility of death


Of course the most important reason to implement safety regulations is to keep workers safe. Brightly colored vests let people know construction is taking place, so they will be careful when approaching the site. Hard hats, steel toed boots, the use of safe chemicals, are all things that keep workers safe. Not only do these things limit the number of accidents, but they can even prevent deaths from occurring on dangerous job sites. Protecting the workers, results in a safer workplace, one where people are cautious, and one where accidents don't take place nearly as often.

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The initial process of designing for educational facilities usually encompasses the following thought sequence:


1 Assess the existing situation and define what action needs to be taken

2 Determine what needs to be taught and the support activities that will occur as a part of the curriculum

3 Determine number of students and faculty to be housed and grade-level organization

4 Determine community needs

5 Review all needs in light of district goals and policies and make any appropriate adjustments

In building a vibrant and help educational facility, community engagement is a critical element of cultivating a successful built environment. A positive space promotes cohesiveness and facilitates social interactions. There are a few options for incorporating community input such as a design workshop that includes all the users of the proposed space. This option is a collaborative process that fosters an open working environment so that everyone participates and they are encouraged to offer diverse opinions and an attitude of discovery. From the beginning, design workshops are integral forums that can take on comprehensive and holistic approaches to community-based design and planning. With a commitment to creating special spaces that meet today’s needs, honest and effective meetings are critical. Relevant entities such as the Planning Commission, Neighborhood Councils, Focus Groups, and Stakeholder Groups, help shape the results of a plan or project in way that improve its utility and how it affects the community. In addition, new technology-influenced approaches to hearing community voices include Photo-voice and Instagram with tags. These activities empower users to express their view and opinions through photos. Once the designer immerses himself/herself into the narrative of the environment, the perspectives can then be taken into consideration and integrated into the overall design.

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The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (http://www.ipcc.ch/) issues their “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability” report today.  The press release (http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/ar5/pr_wg2/140330_pr_wgII_spm_en.pdf) essentially highlights how our response to climate change will be central to our survival and the continued function of world economies.  They mention how adapting to past events caused by climate change may not protect us from future events.  As architects and the many stakeholders define what resilience is, we need to look forward as well as backward.  Predictive models of what is to come will be more important than ever.  Minimal baseline design requirements such as building codes may not be dynamic enough to explain the conditions our buildings and sites will actually face.  Architects will very likely be expected to design with certain levels of code plus resilience in the near future.
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In the beginning stages of assessing an educational laboratory, the architecture firm must engage the stakeholders to define the design parameters and goals. The initial programming is a process of validating and cultivating a community-based design with faculty, administration, and students. Then the preliminary lab design establishes an understanding between the technical and scientific layout in accordance with the educational institution’s requirements. Through a series of checks and balances, brainstorming, and logistics reviews, the programming and pre-schematic package will be refined countless times until it is ready for the next stage. Once that is completed, the designer will prepare more detailed schematic plans and room data sheets for faculty review at an opportune time during the school year. Then during the following months, the designer will complete the S.D. package, working with staff and administration.

Technical and scientific buildings require spaces designed for highly specific uses and critical connections between these spaces. The architecture firm will verify that the pre-schematic diagrams incorporate public-private orientation of spaces, security requirements and other programmatic information work as designed.

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Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Committee on Architecture for Education

Scientists predict that extreme meteorological events are becoming more frequent and destructive. For instance late last year, Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm recorded in the world so far, decimated central island cities in the Philippines. Recent data sourced from the Japanese Meteorological Agency indicated extreme weather occurrences across the globe. These pose critical challenges to our current and future rebuilding programs in cities where extreme weather has become the new “benchmark for disaster prevention,” as suggested during a congress meeting in the Philippines by the UN Champion for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation for Asia Pacific, Senator Loren Legarda. What are the systems and strategies that can get us to resiliency?

Read more at Metropolis POV: http://bit.ly/OfOlea
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From speaking with a few Principals at past AIA SF events who specialize in the education sector, I started formulating a general approach towards designing for college campuses. I noticed that there were 5 commonalities that arose. I went over these points in length with my firm, Kwan Henmi Architecture & Planning, and came away with the following main components:

Overall Approach:


Communication – Maintaining a successful outreach between the district, college, and community. A forum could be formed to generate constructive comments on what the shared community envisions. Creating an identity is crucial to the end product. Success can only be achieved if the users are able to proceed with the operational needs, feel a level of attachment to the campus, and accept the space as their own. With the power of technology upon us, firms are able to post and update design content, meeting notes, and other materials on an interactive project website. Social media outlets like Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter are good indicators of how the project is going.

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Knowledge Communities (cross tag) : Committee on Architecture for Education

As more sustainable design, construction, and operation means and methods spread across our industry and we begin dealing with greater resiliency to less predictable and more extreme weather, how populations use buildings and what they do in emergencies is becoming more important. 

Those who use and operate buildings have a great deal of impact on how the buildings perform and how long they last.  We can design many sustainable features in to buildings that can be circumvented by those who use the buildings.  Overriding light and temperature controls, leaving exhaust fans on when not required, leaving windows and doors open when systems are working to control indoor conditions, exceeding plug load assumptions, exceeding the planned use of potable water for irrigation and maintenance, leaving clogged or failed filters in system, or disabling building automation alarms and notifications are only some of the ways the sustainability of buildings can be downgraded.

One avenue of addressing this issue is the USGBC announced initiatives to encourage educational programs on sustainability in schools (

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I’m aware that this entry isn’t exactly the bare-bones architecture but the thing is that companies with lower planning and execution budgets are forced to assign AT teams jobs of interior and energy consumption design draft (my exact case) and this article reflects considerations and problems we run onto in the process.

With the typical US family spending more than $1,900 a year on home utility bills, implementing proper heating/cooling controls is a right thing to plan for.

In fact, a research done in 2013 by Green Economy Revolution in UK showed that various thermostats and heating/cooling controls enables you to save more than 30% on electricity bill.

But why being concerned with building energy savings?

See this link:

Well, the answer seems simple.

First, it saves the top dollar and secondly, it is good for the overall economy and environment. Information provided by the

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Member Slideshows are created each year for the Spring Conference to illustrate the recent work of the attendee’s firms. All COD members are welcome to participate. Attendees have 6 slides and 60 seconds to present their projects, or whatever is on their mind. Many of the 2012 Member Slideshow slides are posted on the COD Pinterest page.




Grand Hyatt New York;  New York, NY  Photo Credit: Grand Hyatt


Le Bernardin; New York, NY  Photo Credit: Eduard Hueber


Apella;
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As the 2030 Challenge deadline approaches, people are beginning to question if global carbon-neutrality is a feasible reality. But the question should not be whether we can build one carbon-neutral building, as many individual buildings have reached this goal, but rather the question should be whether we will build a carbon-neutral community. What drives the built environment’s impact on the world and climate change ultimately comes down to the knowledge of each architect and their willingness to push the limits of design.

Despite schools and practices claiming to have used sustainable building techniques since the 1970s, there are still less than 1000 net-zero energy buildings in the world today (http://www.enob.info/en/net-zero-energy-buildings/map/). As emerging professionals, this led us to a few questions. What were architects taught in school that equipped them with the proper knowledge and motivation to design for carbon-neutrality? What are architects being taught in practice to continue this knowledge and build innovation? What is preventing this knowledge from being implemented on a global scale? What are the gaps of knowledge within our field that could be explored to reach the goals of the 2030 Challenge?
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The global need for affordable housing is massive and growing rapidly. India alone estimates that they currently have a housing shortage of over 18 million dwelling units, and that number continues to grow. China and many African nations are in a similar condition with population growth fast out pacing housing production. Skilled construction labor is in short supply.

Working with an international consortium, James B. Guthrie, AIA, president of Miletus Group, Inc., has developed designs and a design-build strategy to bring the benefits of prefabrication and modern methods of construction to worldwide areas of need.

James will share the story of the design, its design-build process, and how this international team came together to offer a new scheme for building worldwide affordable housing.

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